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Longitudinal relationships between financial stress and eating disorder features in undergraduate students

Longitudinal relationships between financial stress and eating disorder features in undergraduate students
Longitudinal relationships between financial stress and eating disorder features in undergraduate students
Objective: Previous research has shown a relationship between financial difficulties and poor mental health in students, but there has been no research examining such a relationship for eating attitudes.

Method: A group of 444 British undergraduate students completed the Index of Financial Stress and the Eating Attitudes Test (26-item version) at up to four time points across a year at university.


Results: Higher baseline financial difficulties significantly predicted higher eating attitudes scores at times 3 and 4 (up to a year), after adjusting for demographic variables and baseline eating attitudes score. Lower family affluence also predicted higher eating attitudes scores at time 4 (up to a year). A higher eating attitudes score at baseline also significantly predicted greater financial difficulties at time 2 (3-4 months). When considering these relationships by gender, they were significant for women only.

Discussion: Greater financial difficulties and lower family affluence predict a worsening in eating attitudes over time in female students. The relationship appears to be partially bidirectional, with financial difficulties driving poorer eating attitudes in the shorter term.
0276-3478
Richardson, T.
f8d84122-b061-4322-a594-5ef2eb5cad0d
Elliott, Peter
5822a831-b8e7-440d-9b0d-81721337a3e2
Waller, Glenn
8f917a34-f50f-4703-a50f-dc9a9a6fc24b
Bell, Lorraine
8842a426-0a9d-45c0-81d8-6bbd552b7548
Richardson, T.
f8d84122-b061-4322-a594-5ef2eb5cad0d
Elliott, Peter
5822a831-b8e7-440d-9b0d-81721337a3e2
Waller, Glenn
8f917a34-f50f-4703-a50f-dc9a9a6fc24b
Bell, Lorraine
8842a426-0a9d-45c0-81d8-6bbd552b7548

Richardson, T., Elliott, Peter, Waller, Glenn and Bell, Lorraine (2015) Longitudinal relationships between financial stress and eating disorder features in undergraduate students. International Journal of Eating Disorders. (In Press)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: Previous research has shown a relationship between financial difficulties and poor mental health in students, but there has been no research examining such a relationship for eating attitudes.

Method: A group of 444 British undergraduate students completed the Index of Financial Stress and the Eating Attitudes Test (26-item version) at up to four time points across a year at university.


Results: Higher baseline financial difficulties significantly predicted higher eating attitudes scores at times 3 and 4 (up to a year), after adjusting for demographic variables and baseline eating attitudes score. Lower family affluence also predicted higher eating attitudes scores at time 4 (up to a year). A higher eating attitudes score at baseline also significantly predicted greater financial difficulties at time 2 (3-4 months). When considering these relationships by gender, they were significant for women only.

Discussion: Greater financial difficulties and lower family affluence predict a worsening in eating attitudes over time in female students. The relationship appears to be partially bidirectional, with financial difficulties driving poorer eating attitudes in the shorter term.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2015
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 373053
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/373053
ISSN: 0276-3478
PURE UUID: 5ec18c6e-f659-4586-9c7f-971295a123ef

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Date deposited: 06 Jan 2015 14:01
Last modified: 03 Apr 2020 16:38

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