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A study of the relationship between the video head impulse test and air calorics

A study of the relationship between the video head impulse test and air calorics
A study of the relationship between the video head impulse test and air calorics
The video head impulse test (vHIT) has been proposed as an objective approach to detect peripheral vestibular disorder in a clinical setting. Data from several studies indicate that the vHIT is a useful addition to the vestibular test battery and can give complementary information to caloric testing. This study explores the relationship between lateral canal vestibular occular reflex gain measured using the vHIT system and canal paresis indicated using air calorics in a sample of patients attending a clinic for balance disorder. Sensitivity and specificity of the vHIT test relative to calorics was studied for a clinical sample of 51 patients (20 male, 31 female) who attended a private clinic for balance disorders. vHIT gains were compared to the manufacturer’s normative range and to data from a normative study using 30 young volunteers. Of 14 patients in the clinical sample that had significant canal paresis indicated by air calorics, only 4 showed a significant abnormality in either canal using a measurement of vHIT gain. vHIT gain does not correlate with canal paresis as indicated by air caloric testing. vHIT gain appears relatively insensitive to peripheral vestibular disorder as indicated by air caloric testing, although patients that had no caloric response on one side showed abnormal vHIT gain. vHIT testing may be a useful addition to the existing vestibular test battery, but it does not appear to be an alternative to it.
video head impulse test, caloric testing, vestibular, balance
0937-4477
1287-1294
Bell, Steven Lewis
91de0801-d2b7-44ba-8e8e-523e672aed8a
Barker, Fiona
531f9acb-d776-4beb-96a7-a9b020b5b11a
Heselton, Henry
caf6e1e8-c118-45c2-b9f3-e6683dc8323b
MacKenzie, Emma
acebb7fd-72b8-4306-9b08-1bf8f0900cc7
Dewhurst, Debra
c26cfc37-c463-4320-a43b-5c456bce4203
Sanderson, Alan
ea92395a-998b-4bbb-ba91-24b2b1d4f6aa
Bell, Steven Lewis
91de0801-d2b7-44ba-8e8e-523e672aed8a
Barker, Fiona
531f9acb-d776-4beb-96a7-a9b020b5b11a
Heselton, Henry
caf6e1e8-c118-45c2-b9f3-e6683dc8323b
MacKenzie, Emma
acebb7fd-72b8-4306-9b08-1bf8f0900cc7
Dewhurst, Debra
c26cfc37-c463-4320-a43b-5c456bce4203
Sanderson, Alan
ea92395a-998b-4bbb-ba91-24b2b1d4f6aa

Bell, Steven Lewis, Barker, Fiona, Heselton, Henry, MacKenzie, Emma, Dewhurst, Debra and Sanderson, Alan (2015) A study of the relationship between the video head impulse test and air calorics. European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, 272 (5), 1287-1294. (doi:10.1007/s00405-014-3397-4). (PMID: 25416853)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The video head impulse test (vHIT) has been proposed as an objective approach to detect peripheral vestibular disorder in a clinical setting. Data from several studies indicate that the vHIT is a useful addition to the vestibular test battery and can give complementary information to caloric testing. This study explores the relationship between lateral canal vestibular occular reflex gain measured using the vHIT system and canal paresis indicated using air calorics in a sample of patients attending a clinic for balance disorder. Sensitivity and specificity of the vHIT test relative to calorics was studied for a clinical sample of 51 patients (20 male, 31 female) who attended a private clinic for balance disorders. vHIT gains were compared to the manufacturer’s normative range and to data from a normative study using 30 young volunteers. Of 14 patients in the clinical sample that had significant canal paresis indicated by air calorics, only 4 showed a significant abnormality in either canal using a measurement of vHIT gain. vHIT gain does not correlate with canal paresis as indicated by air caloric testing. vHIT gain appears relatively insensitive to peripheral vestibular disorder as indicated by air caloric testing, although patients that had no caloric response on one side showed abnormal vHIT gain. vHIT testing may be a useful addition to the existing vestibular test battery, but it does not appear to be an alternative to it.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 23 November 2014
Published date: May 2015
Keywords: video head impulse test, caloric testing, vestibular, balance
Organisations: Human Sciences Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 373276
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/373276
ISSN: 0937-4477
PURE UUID: ca7b2f34-9ecd-4dcf-9a30-8e53605b3bcc
ORCID for Emma MacKenzie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9585-5620

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Jan 2015 14:08
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:51

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Contributors

Author: Fiona Barker
Author: Henry Heselton
Author: Emma MacKenzie ORCID iD
Author: Debra Dewhurst
Author: Alan Sanderson

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