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Respiratory consequences of late preterm birth

Respiratory consequences of late preterm birth
Respiratory consequences of late preterm birth
In developed countries most preterm births occur between 34 and 37 weeks' gestation. Deliveries during this 'late preterm' period are increasing and, since even mild prematurity is now recognised to be associated with adverse health outcomes, this presents healthcare challenges. Respiratory problems associated with late preterm birth include neonatal respiratory distress, severe RSV infection and childhood wheezing. Late preterm birth prematurely interrupts in utero lung development and is associated with maternal and early life factors which adversely affect the developing respiratory system. This review considers 1) mechanisms underlying the association between late preterm birth and impaired respiratory development, 2) respiratory morbidity associated with late preterm birth, particularly long-term outcomes, and 3) interventions which might protect respiratory development by addressing risk factors affecting the late preterm population, including maternal smoking, early life growth restriction and vulnerability to viral infection.
infant, premature, respiratory function tests, asthma, outcome, intervention
1526-0550
1-7
Pike, Katharine C.
15d8a826-8acd-4c0a-836e-4b589336f449
Lucas, Jane S.A.
5cb3546c-87b2-4e59-af48-402076e25313
Pike, Katharine C.
15d8a826-8acd-4c0a-836e-4b589336f449
Lucas, Jane S.A.
5cb3546c-87b2-4e59-af48-402076e25313

Pike, Katharine C. and Lucas, Jane S.A. (2014) Respiratory consequences of late preterm birth. Paediatric Respiratory Reviews, 1-7. (doi:10.1016/j.prrv.2014.12.001). (PMID:25554628)

Record type: Article

Abstract

In developed countries most preterm births occur between 34 and 37 weeks' gestation. Deliveries during this 'late preterm' period are increasing and, since even mild prematurity is now recognised to be associated with adverse health outcomes, this presents healthcare challenges. Respiratory problems associated with late preterm birth include neonatal respiratory distress, severe RSV infection and childhood wheezing. Late preterm birth prematurely interrupts in utero lung development and is associated with maternal and early life factors which adversely affect the developing respiratory system. This review considers 1) mechanisms underlying the association between late preterm birth and impaired respiratory development, 2) respiratory morbidity associated with late preterm birth, particularly long-term outcomes, and 3) interventions which might protect respiratory development by addressing risk factors affecting the late preterm population, including maternal smoking, early life growth restriction and vulnerability to viral infection.

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More information

Published date: 8 December 2014
Keywords: infant, premature, respiratory function tests, asthma, outcome, intervention
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 373446
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/373446
ISSN: 1526-0550
PURE UUID: c0da5611-b57b-4060-8de8-3804a6b921f9

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2015 11:37
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:34

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Contributors

Author: Katharine C. Pike
Author: Jane S.A. Lucas

University divisions

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