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Native silica nanoparticles are powerful membrane disruptors

Native silica nanoparticles are powerful membrane disruptors
Native silica nanoparticles are powerful membrane disruptors
Silica nanoparticles are under development for intracellular drug delivery applications but can also have cytotoxic effects including cell membrane damage. In this study, we investigated the interactions of silica nanospheres of different size, surface chemistry and biocoating with membranes of phosphatidylcholine lipids. In liposome leakage assays many, but not all, of these nanoparticles induced dose-dependent dye leakage, indicative of membrane perturbation. It was found that 200 and 500 nm native-silica, aminated and carboxylated nanospheres induce near-total dye release from zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine liposomes at a particle/liposome ratio of ~1, regardless of their surface chemistry, which we interpret as particle-supported bilayer formation following a global rearrangement of the vesicular membrane. In contrast, 50 nm diameter native-silica nanospheres did not induce total dye leakage below a particle/liposome ratio of ~8, whereas amination or carboxylation, respectively, strongly reduced or prevented dye release. We postulate that for the smaller nanospheres, strong silica-bilayer interactions are manifested as bilayer engulfement of membrane-adsorbed particles, with localized lipid depletion eventually leading to collapse of the vesicular membrane. Protein coating of the particles considerably reduced dye leakage and lipid bilayer coating prevented dye release all together, while the inclusion of 33% anionic lipids in the liposomes reduced dye leakage for both native-silica and aminated surfaces. These results, which are compared with the effect of polystyrene nanoparticles and other engineered nanomaterials on lipid bilayers, and which are discussed in relation to nanosilica-induced cell membrane damage and cytotoxicity, indicate that a native-silica nanoparticle surface chemistry is a particularly strong membrane interaction motif.
1463-9076
15547-15560
Alkhammash, Hend I.
dbd590b1-19ee-4da2-a582-8734156d483d
Li, Nan
eeea0e0a-41f0-4b88-9f11-56776d3f24a9
Berthier, Rémy
0f0712df-c619-4dad-9ac0-2b58aa54357b
de Planque, Maurits R.R.
a1d33d13-f516-44fb-8d2c-c51d18bc21ba
Alkhammash, Hend I.
dbd590b1-19ee-4da2-a582-8734156d483d
Li, Nan
eeea0e0a-41f0-4b88-9f11-56776d3f24a9
Berthier, Rémy
0f0712df-c619-4dad-9ac0-2b58aa54357b
de Planque, Maurits R.R.
a1d33d13-f516-44fb-8d2c-c51d18bc21ba

Alkhammash, Hend I., Li, Nan, Berthier, Rémy and de Planque, Maurits R.R. (2015) Native silica nanoparticles are powerful membrane disruptors. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 17, 15547-15560. (doi:10.1039/C4CP05882H). (PMID:25623776)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Silica nanoparticles are under development for intracellular drug delivery applications but can also have cytotoxic effects including cell membrane damage. In this study, we investigated the interactions of silica nanospheres of different size, surface chemistry and biocoating with membranes of phosphatidylcholine lipids. In liposome leakage assays many, but not all, of these nanoparticles induced dose-dependent dye leakage, indicative of membrane perturbation. It was found that 200 and 500 nm native-silica, aminated and carboxylated nanospheres induce near-total dye release from zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine liposomes at a particle/liposome ratio of ~1, regardless of their surface chemistry, which we interpret as particle-supported bilayer formation following a global rearrangement of the vesicular membrane. In contrast, 50 nm diameter native-silica nanospheres did not induce total dye leakage below a particle/liposome ratio of ~8, whereas amination or carboxylation, respectively, strongly reduced or prevented dye release. We postulate that for the smaller nanospheres, strong silica-bilayer interactions are manifested as bilayer engulfement of membrane-adsorbed particles, with localized lipid depletion eventually leading to collapse of the vesicular membrane. Protein coating of the particles considerably reduced dye leakage and lipid bilayer coating prevented dye release all together, while the inclusion of 33% anionic lipids in the liposomes reduced dye leakage for both native-silica and aminated surfaces. These results, which are compared with the effect of polystyrene nanoparticles and other engineered nanomaterials on lipid bilayers, and which are discussed in relation to nanosilica-induced cell membrane damage and cytotoxicity, indicate that a native-silica nanoparticle surface chemistry is a particularly strong membrane interaction motif.

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Accepted/In Press date: 19 January 2015
Published date: 19 January 2015
Organisations: Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology

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Local EPrints ID: 373463
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/373463
ISSN: 1463-9076
PURE UUID: 2a0da5de-387b-42a6-aca2-c26d1b0dfe6e
ORCID for Maurits R.R. de Planque: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8787-0513

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Date deposited: 19 Jan 2015 11:54
Last modified: 05 Nov 2019 01:45

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Contributors

Author: Hend I. Alkhammash
Author: Nan Li
Author: Rémy Berthier
Author: Maurits R.R. de Planque ORCID iD

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