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Biological impacts of enhanced alkalinity in Carcinus maenas

Biological impacts of enhanced alkalinity in Carcinus maenas
Biological impacts of enhanced alkalinity in Carcinus maenas
Further steps are needed to establish feasible alleviation strategies that are able to reduce the impacts of ocean acidification, whilst ensuring minimal biological side-effects in the process. Whilst there is a growing body of literature on the biological impacts of many other carbon dioxide reduction techniques, seemingly little is known about enhanced alkalinity. For this reason, we investigated the potential physiological impacts of using chemical sequestration as an alleviation strategy. In a controlled experiment, Carcinus maenas were acutely exposed to concentrations of Ca(OH)2 that would be required to reverse the decline in ocean surface pH and return it to pre-industrial levels. Acute exposure significantly affected all individuals’ acid–base balance resulting in slight respiratory alkalosis and hyperkalemia, which was strongest in mature females. Although the trigger for both of these responses is currently unclear, this study has shown that alkalinity addition does alter acid–base balance in this comparatively robust crustacean species.
Calcium hydroxide, Chemical sequestration, Geoengineering, Climate change, Acid–base balance, Carcinus maenas
0025-326X
190-198
Cripps, Gemma
bb69f201-11cb-4b34-85b3-81720e0b6554
Widdicombe, Stephen
3ecf2b3e-6b3f-4f2f-86c5-baf070e8c82b
Spicer, John I
3f237efa-c331-4b72-afd0-8b8607aa80a7
Findlay, Helen S
22b14520-0926-413e-8fd2-c5180c839eee
Cripps, Gemma
bb69f201-11cb-4b34-85b3-81720e0b6554
Widdicombe, Stephen
3ecf2b3e-6b3f-4f2f-86c5-baf070e8c82b
Spicer, John I
3f237efa-c331-4b72-afd0-8b8607aa80a7
Findlay, Helen S
22b14520-0926-413e-8fd2-c5180c839eee

Cripps, Gemma, Widdicombe, Stephen, Spicer, John I and Findlay, Helen S (2013) Biological impacts of enhanced alkalinity in Carcinus maenas. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 71 (1-2), 190-198. (doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2013.03.015).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Further steps are needed to establish feasible alleviation strategies that are able to reduce the impacts of ocean acidification, whilst ensuring minimal biological side-effects in the process. Whilst there is a growing body of literature on the biological impacts of many other carbon dioxide reduction techniques, seemingly little is known about enhanced alkalinity. For this reason, we investigated the potential physiological impacts of using chemical sequestration as an alleviation strategy. In a controlled experiment, Carcinus maenas were acutely exposed to concentrations of Ca(OH)2 that would be required to reverse the decline in ocean surface pH and return it to pre-industrial levels. Acute exposure significantly affected all individuals’ acid–base balance resulting in slight respiratory alkalosis and hyperkalemia, which was strongest in mature females. Although the trigger for both of these responses is currently unclear, this study has shown that alkalinity addition does alter acid–base balance in this comparatively robust crustacean species.

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More information

Published date: 15 June 2013
Keywords: Calcium hydroxide, Chemical sequestration, Geoengineering, Climate change, Acid–base balance, Carcinus maenas
Organisations: Ocean and Earth Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 373521
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/373521
ISSN: 0025-326X
PURE UUID: 26de8036-da20-46f0-8273-b43cc926b76d

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Date deposited: 20 Jan 2015 14:11
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 00:35

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Contributors

Author: Gemma Cripps
Author: Stephen Widdicombe
Author: John I Spicer
Author: Helen S Findlay

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