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Anticipatory processes in brain state switching — Evidence from a novel cued-switching task implicating default mode and salience networks

Anticipatory processes in brain state switching — Evidence from a novel cued-switching task implicating default mode and salience networks
Anticipatory processes in brain state switching — Evidence from a novel cued-switching task implicating default mode and salience networks
The defaultmode network (DMN) is the core brain systemsupporting internally oriented cognition. The ability to attenuate theDMNwhen switching to externally oriented processing is a prerequisite for effective performance and
adaptive self-regulation. Right anterior insula (rAI), a core hub of the salience network (SN), has been proposed to
control the switching from DMN to task-relevant brain networks. Little is currently known about the extent of
anticipatory processes subserved by DMN and SN during switching. We investigated anticipatory DMN and SN modulation using a novel cued-switching task of between-state (rest-to-task/task-to-rest) and within-state
(task-to-task) transitions. Twenty healthy adults performed the task implemented in an event-related functional
magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design. Increases in activity were observed in the DMN regions in response
to cues signalling upcoming rest. DMN attenuation was observed for rest-to-task switch cues. Obversely, DMN
was up-regulated by task-to-rest cues. The strongest rAI response was observed to rest-to-task switch cues. Taskto-
task switch cues elicited smaller rAI activation, whereas no significant rAI activation occurred for task-to-rest
switches. Our data provide the first evidence that DMN modulation occurs rapidly and can be elicited by short duration cues signalling rest- and task-related state switches. The role of rAI appears to be limited to certain switch types — those implicating transition from a resting state and to tasks involving active cognitive engagement.
359-365
Sidlauskaite, Justina
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Wiersema, Jan R.
cc91556a-6a9f-4079-b0b8-502bd729b936
Roeyers, Herbert
3554b6b3-e364-4a6a-9e8b-64f5188a6d60
Krebs, Ruth M.
323a3a58-bc24-4e1d-8fbe-5f1af1eddea3
Vassena, Eliana
4462aaf1-89a6-44bb-82ad-ccd387141a3f
Fias, Wim
9002ba8c-ff8b-451b-93c9-d0f632749770
Brass, Marcel
96ac528f-3815-4631-8b7d-3fa2bf4c0aad
Achten, Eric
a88e206b-8e6c-425b-930f-759e559f130d
Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635
Sidlauskaite, Justina
a50d8acf-707d-4799-b4e7-e71fef98cc7b
Wiersema, Jan R.
cc91556a-6a9f-4079-b0b8-502bd729b936
Roeyers, Herbert
3554b6b3-e364-4a6a-9e8b-64f5188a6d60
Krebs, Ruth M.
323a3a58-bc24-4e1d-8fbe-5f1af1eddea3
Vassena, Eliana
4462aaf1-89a6-44bb-82ad-ccd387141a3f
Fias, Wim
9002ba8c-ff8b-451b-93c9-d0f632749770
Brass, Marcel
96ac528f-3815-4631-8b7d-3fa2bf4c0aad
Achten, Eric
a88e206b-8e6c-425b-930f-759e559f130d
Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.S.
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635

Sidlauskaite, Justina, Wiersema, Jan R., Roeyers, Herbert, Krebs, Ruth M., Vassena, Eliana, Fias, Wim, Brass, Marcel, Achten, Eric and Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.S. (2014) Anticipatory processes in brain state switching — Evidence from a novel cued-switching task implicating default mode and salience networks. Neuroimage, 98, 359-365. (doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.05.010). (PMID:24830839)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The defaultmode network (DMN) is the core brain systemsupporting internally oriented cognition. The ability to attenuate theDMNwhen switching to externally oriented processing is a prerequisite for effective performance and
adaptive self-regulation. Right anterior insula (rAI), a core hub of the salience network (SN), has been proposed to
control the switching from DMN to task-relevant brain networks. Little is currently known about the extent of
anticipatory processes subserved by DMN and SN during switching. We investigated anticipatory DMN and SN modulation using a novel cued-switching task of between-state (rest-to-task/task-to-rest) and within-state
(task-to-task) transitions. Twenty healthy adults performed the task implemented in an event-related functional
magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design. Increases in activity were observed in the DMN regions in response
to cues signalling upcoming rest. DMN attenuation was observed for rest-to-task switch cues. Obversely, DMN
was up-regulated by task-to-rest cues. The strongest rAI response was observed to rest-to-task switch cues. Taskto-
task switch cues elicited smaller rAI activation, whereas no significant rAI activation occurred for task-to-rest
switches. Our data provide the first evidence that DMN modulation occurs rapidly and can be elicited by short duration cues signalling rest- and task-related state switches. The role of rAI appears to be limited to certain switch types — those implicating transition from a resting state and to tasks involving active cognitive engagement.

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Accepted/In Press date: 2 May 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 May 2014
Published date: September 2014
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 373969
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/373969
PURE UUID: 1983185b-39bf-404f-a856-769221045362

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Date deposited: 03 Feb 2015 16:59
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:30

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Contributors

Author: Justina Sidlauskaite
Author: Jan R. Wiersema
Author: Herbert Roeyers
Author: Ruth M. Krebs
Author: Eliana Vassena
Author: Wim Fias
Author: Marcel Brass
Author: Eric Achten
Author: Edmund J.S. Sonuga-Barke

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