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Linking hydrothermal geochemistry to organismal physiology: Physiological versatility in Riftia pachyptila from sedimented and basalt-hosted vents

Linking hydrothermal geochemistry to organismal physiology: Physiological versatility in Riftia pachyptila from sedimented and basalt-hosted vents
Linking hydrothermal geochemistry to organismal physiology: Physiological versatility in Riftia pachyptila from sedimented and basalt-hosted vents
Much of what is known regarding Riftia pachyptila physiology is based on the wealth of studies of tubeworms living at diffuse flows along the fast-spreading, basalt-hosted East Pacific Rise (EPR). These studies have collectively suggested that Riftia pachyptila and its chemoautotrophic symbionts are physiologically specialized, highly productive associations relying on hydrogen sulfide and oxygen to generate energy for carbon fixation, and the symbiont's nitrate reduction to ammonia for energy and biosynthesis. However, Riftia also flourish in sediment-hosted vents, which are markedly different in geochemistry than basalt-hosted systems. Here we present data from shipboard physiological studies and global quantitative proteomic analyses of Riftia pachyptila trophosome tissue recovered from tubeworms residing in the EPR and the Guaymas basin, a sedimented, hydrothermal vent field. We observed marked differences in symbiont nitrogen metabolism in both the respirometric and proteomic data. The proteomic data further suggest that Riftia associations in Guaymas may utilize different sulfur compounds for energy generation, may have an increased capacity for energy storage, and may play a role in degrading exogenous organic carbon. Together these data reveal that Riftia symbionts are far more physiologically plastic than previously considered, and that -contrary to previous assertions- Riftia do assimilate reduced nitrogen in some habitats. These observations raise new hypotheses regarding adaptations to the geochemical diversity of habitats occupied by Riftia, and the degree to which the environment influences symbiont physiology and evolution.
1932-6203
e21692
Robidart, Julie C.
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Roque, Annelys
ce9724af-2a68-45e4-9bae-09b29ede4967
Song, Pengfei
3782998a-89e4-4b87-a879-26ebdbd98590
Girguis, Peter R.
fdaadd84-238b-4d37-b030-b5c4749269f7
Robidart, Julie C.
1d72ac92-7dca-49a0-9f9e-26798387e66b
Roque, Annelys
ce9724af-2a68-45e4-9bae-09b29ede4967
Song, Pengfei
3782998a-89e4-4b87-a879-26ebdbd98590
Girguis, Peter R.
fdaadd84-238b-4d37-b030-b5c4749269f7

Robidart, Julie C., Roque, Annelys, Song, Pengfei and Girguis, Peter R. (2011) Linking hydrothermal geochemistry to organismal physiology: Physiological versatility in Riftia pachyptila from sedimented and basalt-hosted vents. PLoS ONE, 6 (7), e21692. (doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0021692).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Much of what is known regarding Riftia pachyptila physiology is based on the wealth of studies of tubeworms living at diffuse flows along the fast-spreading, basalt-hosted East Pacific Rise (EPR). These studies have collectively suggested that Riftia pachyptila and its chemoautotrophic symbionts are physiologically specialized, highly productive associations relying on hydrogen sulfide and oxygen to generate energy for carbon fixation, and the symbiont's nitrate reduction to ammonia for energy and biosynthesis. However, Riftia also flourish in sediment-hosted vents, which are markedly different in geochemistry than basalt-hosted systems. Here we present data from shipboard physiological studies and global quantitative proteomic analyses of Riftia pachyptila trophosome tissue recovered from tubeworms residing in the EPR and the Guaymas basin, a sedimented, hydrothermal vent field. We observed marked differences in symbiont nitrogen metabolism in both the respirometric and proteomic data. The proteomic data further suggest that Riftia associations in Guaymas may utilize different sulfur compounds for energy generation, may have an increased capacity for energy storage, and may play a role in degrading exogenous organic carbon. Together these data reveal that Riftia symbionts are far more physiologically plastic than previously considered, and that -contrary to previous assertions- Riftia do assimilate reduced nitrogen in some habitats. These observations raise new hypotheses regarding adaptations to the geochemical diversity of habitats occupied by Riftia, and the degree to which the environment influences symbiont physiology and evolution.

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Published date: 14 July 2011
Organisations: Ocean Technology and Engineering

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Local EPrints ID: 374097
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374097
ISSN: 1932-6203
PURE UUID: 73ff8f12-5bb5-4501-acae-2f84d6ff8648

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Date deposited: 03 Feb 2015 13:33
Last modified: 20 Nov 2021 19:43

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Contributors

Author: Julie C. Robidart
Author: Annelys Roque
Author: Pengfei Song
Author: Peter R. Girguis

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