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Coupling metabolite flux to transcriptomics: insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying primary productivity by the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae

Coupling metabolite flux to transcriptomics: insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying primary productivity by the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae
Coupling metabolite flux to transcriptomics: insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying primary productivity by the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae
Deep-sea hydrothermal vents host highly productive ecosystems. Many of these communities are dominated by vestimentiferan tubeworms that house endosymbiotic chemoautotrophic bacteria that provide the hosts with their primary nutritional needs. Rates of carbon fixation by these symbioses are also among the highest recorded. Despite the breadth of physiological and biochemical research on these associations, the underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate host and symbiont metabolite flux and carbon fixation are largely unknown. Here we present metabolite flux and transcriptomics data from shipboard high-pressure respirometry experiments in which we maintained Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms at conditions comparable to those in situ. Host trophosome was used for cDNA library construction and sequencing. Of the 19,132 clones sequenced, 10,684 represented unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs). The highest proportions of genes are involved with translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis, cellular processing, and signal transduction. There was moderate representation of genes involved in metabolite exchange and acid-base regulation. These data represent the first concomitant surveys of metabolite flux rates and gene expression for a chemoautotrophic symbiosis during net autotrophy, and they suggest that-in the case of Ridgeia piscesae-host-symbiont interactions such as cell cycle regulation may play a significant role in maintaining physiological poise during high productivity.
0006-3185
255-265
Nyholm, Spencer V.
7e1faa34-f92c-4995-848e-71dfe0a29079
Robidart, Julie
a9b8d49c-c1e3-4a3b-a53c-685a0f2c7f93
Girguis, Peter R.
fdaadd84-238b-4d37-b030-b5c4749269f7
Nyholm, Spencer V.
7e1faa34-f92c-4995-848e-71dfe0a29079
Robidart, Julie
a9b8d49c-c1e3-4a3b-a53c-685a0f2c7f93
Girguis, Peter R.
fdaadd84-238b-4d37-b030-b5c4749269f7

Nyholm, Spencer V., Robidart, Julie and Girguis, Peter R. (2008) Coupling metabolite flux to transcriptomics: insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying primary productivity by the hydrothermal vent tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae. Biological Bulletin, 214 (3), 255-265. (PMID:18574102)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Deep-sea hydrothermal vents host highly productive ecosystems. Many of these communities are dominated by vestimentiferan tubeworms that house endosymbiotic chemoautotrophic bacteria that provide the hosts with their primary nutritional needs. Rates of carbon fixation by these symbioses are also among the highest recorded. Despite the breadth of physiological and biochemical research on these associations, the underlying molecular mechanisms that regulate host and symbiont metabolite flux and carbon fixation are largely unknown. Here we present metabolite flux and transcriptomics data from shipboard high-pressure respirometry experiments in which we maintained Ridgeia piscesae tubeworms at conditions comparable to those in situ. Host trophosome was used for cDNA library construction and sequencing. Of the 19,132 clones sequenced, 10,684 represented unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs). The highest proportions of genes are involved with translation, ribosomal structure and biogenesis, cellular processing, and signal transduction. There was moderate representation of genes involved in metabolite exchange and acid-base regulation. These data represent the first concomitant surveys of metabolite flux rates and gene expression for a chemoautotrophic symbiosis during net autotrophy, and they suggest that-in the case of Ridgeia piscesae-host-symbiont interactions such as cell cycle regulation may play a significant role in maintaining physiological poise during high productivity.

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Published date: June 2008
Organisations: Ocean Technology and Engineering

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374098
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374098
ISSN: 0006-3185
PURE UUID: f8e8cf5b-08e4-434b-84da-69426329d26f

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Date deposited: 03 Feb 2015 13:44
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 02:22

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Contributors

Author: Spencer V. Nyholm
Author: Julie Robidart
Author: Peter R. Girguis

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