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Business ethics: too little, too late

Business ethics: too little, too late
Business ethics: too little, too late
Describes the marginal accommodation of courses in business ethics within the business studies first degree curriculum. Focusing principally on the role of law and economics, argues that introductory subject study within business studies degrees plays a significant role in underpinning free?market principles and undermining ethical concerns. As a result students are encouraged to regard business activity as legitimately distinct from society. Concludes that courses in business ethics are under pressure to conform to a vocational rationale demonstrating the market benefits of ethical behaviour rather than encouraging students to examine fundamentally the assumptions and effects of business practice. Also suggests that, as a final?year option, discrete courses in business ethics do little to disturb the market orthodoxy of business studies students.
business education, ethics, law
0040-0912
32-36
Macfarlane, B.
3e2b9eb0-1772-4642-bb51-ab49cc5b748c
Macfarlane, B.
3e2b9eb0-1772-4642-bb51-ab49cc5b748c

Macfarlane, B. (1995) Business ethics: too little, too late. Education and Training, 37 (5), 32-36. (doi:10.1108/00400919510089130).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Describes the marginal accommodation of courses in business ethics within the business studies first degree curriculum. Focusing principally on the role of law and economics, argues that introductory subject study within business studies degrees plays a significant role in underpinning free?market principles and undermining ethical concerns. As a result students are encouraged to regard business activity as legitimately distinct from society. Concludes that courses in business ethics are under pressure to conform to a vocational rationale demonstrating the market benefits of ethical behaviour rather than encouraging students to examine fundamentally the assumptions and effects of business practice. Also suggests that, as a final?year option, discrete courses in business ethics do little to disturb the market orthodoxy of business studies students.

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More information

Published date: 1995
Keywords: business education, ethics, law
Organisations: Southampton Education School

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374151
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374151
ISSN: 0040-0912
PURE UUID: 8fa61844-3ffc-463a-944c-58cf45580539

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Date deposited: 05 Feb 2015 15:13
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:28

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