The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Business and management studies in higher education: the challenge of academic legitimacy

Business and management studies in higher education: the challenge of academic legitimacy
Business and management studies in higher education: the challenge of academic legitimacy
Critics argue that the core values of higher education, including academic freedom and intellectual detachment, conflict with the more prosaic aims and ethos of business and management education. Analyses the isolation of business and management studies within this culture by reference to its epistemological, academic, institutional, doctrinal and professional identity. Argues that the ethos of business and management departments closely resembles an academic culture despite perceptions to the contrary in the wider academic community. However, acceptance of business and management in the academy as a legitimate social profession dictates the need for a broader curriculum which treats humanistic values as a central, rather than peripheral, concern.
academic staff, business schools, higher education, management education, professions, united kingdom
0951-354X
4-9
Macfarlane, B.
3e2b9eb0-1772-4642-bb51-ab49cc5b748c
Macfarlane, B.
3e2b9eb0-1772-4642-bb51-ab49cc5b748c

(1995) Business and management studies in higher education: the challenge of academic legitimacy. International Journal of Educational Management, 9 (5), 4-9. (doi:10.1108/09513549510095059).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Critics argue that the core values of higher education, including academic freedom and intellectual detachment, conflict with the more prosaic aims and ethos of business and management education. Analyses the isolation of business and management studies within this culture by reference to its epistemological, academic, institutional, doctrinal and professional identity. Argues that the ethos of business and management departments closely resembles an academic culture despite perceptions to the contrary in the wider academic community. However, acceptance of business and management in the academy as a legitimate social profession dictates the need for a broader curriculum which treats humanistic values as a central, rather than peripheral, concern.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 1995
Keywords: academic staff, business schools, higher education, management education, professions, united kingdom
Organisations: Southampton Education School

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374152
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374152
ISSN: 0951-354X
PURE UUID: 02f936f1-db70-46c5-a508-a75537736e49

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Feb 2015 15:17
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:29

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×