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Testing the reliability of hands and ears as biometrics: the importance of viewpoint

Testing the reliability of hands and ears as biometrics: the importance of viewpoint
Testing the reliability of hands and ears as biometrics: the importance of viewpoint
Two experiments are presented to explore the limits when matching a sample to a suspect utilising the hand as a novel biometric. The results of Experiment 1 revealed that novice participants were able to match hands at above-chance levels as viewpoint changed. Notably, a moderate change in viewpoint had no notable effect, but a more substantial change in viewpoint affected performance significantly. Importantly, the impact of viewpoint when matching hands was smaller than that when matching ears in a control condition. This was consistent with the suggestion that the flexibility of the hand may have minimised the negative impact of a sub-optimal view. The results of Experiment 2 confirmed that training via a 10-min expert video was sufficient to reduce the impact of viewpoint in the most difficult case but not to remove it entirely. The implications of these results were discussed in terms of the theoretical importance of function when considering the canonical view and in terms of the applied value of the hand as a reliable biometric across viewing conditions.
0340-0727
1-31
Stevenage, Sarah V.
493f8c57-9af9-4783-b189-e06b8e958460
Walpole, Catherine
2d262f78-3956-4425-a667-c5250999fc6c
Neil, Greg J.
85453750-0611-48d9-a83e-da95cd4e80b3
Black, Sue M.
12495b22-4042-499d-8221-f33b10cbe436
Stevenage, Sarah V.
493f8c57-9af9-4783-b189-e06b8e958460
Walpole, Catherine
2d262f78-3956-4425-a667-c5250999fc6c
Neil, Greg J.
85453750-0611-48d9-a83e-da95cd4e80b3
Black, Sue M.
12495b22-4042-499d-8221-f33b10cbe436

Stevenage, Sarah V., Walpole, Catherine, Neil, Greg J. and Black, Sue M. (2014) Testing the reliability of hands and ears as biometrics: the importance of viewpoint. Psychological Research, 1-31. (doi:10.1007/s00426-014-0625-x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Two experiments are presented to explore the limits when matching a sample to a suspect utilising the hand as a novel biometric. The results of Experiment 1 revealed that novice participants were able to match hands at above-chance levels as viewpoint changed. Notably, a moderate change in viewpoint had no notable effect, but a more substantial change in viewpoint affected performance significantly. Importantly, the impact of viewpoint when matching hands was smaller than that when matching ears in a control condition. This was consistent with the suggestion that the flexibility of the hand may have minimised the negative impact of a sub-optimal view. The results of Experiment 2 confirmed that training via a 10-min expert video was sufficient to reduce the impact of viewpoint in the most difficult case but not to remove it entirely. The implications of these results were discussed in terms of the theoretical importance of function when considering the canonical view and in terms of the applied value of the hand as a reliable biometric across viewing conditions.

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Published date: 2014
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374185
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374185
ISSN: 0340-0727
PURE UUID: 13cbaf1c-ad72-4ea5-a8e4-12e569bb6eb1
ORCID for Sarah V. Stevenage: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4155-2939

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Feb 2015 13:06
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:19

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