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Self-building safe havens in a post-service landscape: how adults with learning disabilities are reclaiming the welcoming communities agenda

Self-building safe havens in a post-service landscape: how adults with learning disabilities are reclaiming the welcoming communities agenda
Self-building safe havens in a post-service landscape: how adults with learning disabilities are reclaiming the welcoming communities agenda
With the increased commitment towards personalisation in adult social care, allied with more ‘austere’ funding of social services and day centre closures, support is increasingly becoming less placement-driven and woven into everyday spaces within the community. Consequently, support is being re-framed from ‘care’ in formal settings towards an effort at enabling meaningful lives in a post-service landscape nested in local neighbourhoods and ordinary spaces. This paper explores what it means to live in a ‘welcoming community’ within the context of day care centre closures from the perspective of adults with learning disabilities. It draws on empirical data collected from focus groups and photo diaries with adults with learning disabilities on their experiences of negotiating support arrangements. We identify a process of ‘self-building’ safe havens in ordinary British spaces, including allotments, marinas and ‘fish and chip shops’, and argue that adults with learning disabilities are reclaiming the welcoming communities agenda
1464-9365
336-356
Power, Andrew
b3a1ee09-e381-413a-88ac-7cb3e13b3acc
Bartlett, Ruth
b059d54d-9431-43a8-9d1d-19d35ab57ac3
Power, Andrew
b3a1ee09-e381-413a-88ac-7cb3e13b3acc
Bartlett, Ruth
b059d54d-9431-43a8-9d1d-19d35ab57ac3

Power, Andrew and Bartlett, Ruth (2018) Self-building safe havens in a post-service landscape: how adults with learning disabilities are reclaiming the welcoming communities agenda. Social & Cultural Geography, 19 (3), 336-356. (doi:10.1080/14649365.2015.1031686).

Record type: Article

Abstract

With the increased commitment towards personalisation in adult social care, allied with more ‘austere’ funding of social services and day centre closures, support is increasingly becoming less placement-driven and woven into everyday spaces within the community. Consequently, support is being re-framed from ‘care’ in formal settings towards an effort at enabling meaningful lives in a post-service landscape nested in local neighbourhoods and ordinary spaces. This paper explores what it means to live in a ‘welcoming community’ within the context of day care centre closures from the perspective of adults with learning disabilities. It draws on empirical data collected from focus groups and photo diaries with adults with learning disabilities on their experiences of negotiating support arrangements. We identify a process of ‘self-building’ safe havens in ordinary British spaces, including allotments, marinas and ‘fish and chip shops’, and argue that adults with learning disabilities are reclaiming the welcoming communities agenda

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FINAL welcoming communities Power & Bartlett.docx - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2 March 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 18 May 2015
Published date: 2018
Organisations: Population, Health & Wellbeing (PHeW)

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374205
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374205
ISSN: 1464-9365
PURE UUID: fa773234-3deb-4638-9cf0-6f652160a022
ORCID for Andrew Power: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3887-1050
ORCID for Ruth Bartlett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3412-2300

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Feb 2015 11:43
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:38

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