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Marginal groups in marginal times: Gypsy and Traveller parents and home education in England, UK

Marginal groups in marginal times: Gypsy and Traveller parents and home education in England, UK
Marginal groups in marginal times: Gypsy and Traveller parents and home education in England, UK
This article examines the experiences of home education for Gypsy and Traveller groups in England, UK. We argue that home education is perceived in a particular historical ‘moment’ characterised in the media and more generally throughout society by ‘risk’. Against this backdrop this article considers Gypsy and Traveller experiences of home education and their relationships with local education authorities. Drawing on case study data with 10 Gypsy and Traveller families living on the south coast of England we argue that the marginal status of Gypsy and Traveller families exposes them to particular vulnerabilities associated with failure, incompetence and lack of concern regarding the education of their children. This is further heightened in present day ‘risk society’. Drawing on the work of Ulrich Beck, we suggest home education is both a reaction to the risks associated with modernisation and also a perceived risk in itself when equated with issues of child protection and welfare. Despite maintaining community networks and longstanding traditions of home education, Gypsy and Traveller lifestyles are still perceived as being at risk within a ‘moment’ in which home education is under scrutiny
0141-1926
5-20
Bhopal, Kalwant
5ac0970e-1c42-4757-87df-6fdb6f826314
Myers, Martin
7c2c36aa-1db3-425c-9bab-cbb5f7b70ee1
Bhopal, Kalwant
5ac0970e-1c42-4757-87df-6fdb6f826314
Myers, Martin
7c2c36aa-1db3-425c-9bab-cbb5f7b70ee1

Bhopal, Kalwant and Myers, Martin (2015) Marginal groups in marginal times: Gypsy and Traveller parents and home education in England, UK. British Educational Research Journal, 42 (1), 5-20. (doi:10.1002/berj.3198).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article examines the experiences of home education for Gypsy and Traveller groups in England, UK. We argue that home education is perceived in a particular historical ‘moment’ characterised in the media and more generally throughout society by ‘risk’. Against this backdrop this article considers Gypsy and Traveller experiences of home education and their relationships with local education authorities. Drawing on case study data with 10 Gypsy and Traveller families living on the south coast of England we argue that the marginal status of Gypsy and Traveller families exposes them to particular vulnerabilities associated with failure, incompetence and lack of concern regarding the education of their children. This is further heightened in present day ‘risk society’. Drawing on the work of Ulrich Beck, we suggest home education is both a reaction to the risks associated with modernisation and also a perceived risk in itself when equated with issues of child protection and welfare. Despite maintaining community networks and longstanding traditions of home education, Gypsy and Traveller lifestyles are still perceived as being at risk within a ‘moment’ in which home education is under scrutiny

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e-pub ahead of print date: 4 July 2015
Published date: 4 July 2015

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374554
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374554
ISSN: 0141-1926
PURE UUID: 386a95d8-872d-434b-ad5e-c1fbd49a1250

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Date deposited: 20 Feb 2015 14:31
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 06:56

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