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Parental childhood growth and offspring birthweight: pooled analyses from four birth cohorts in low and middle income countries

Parental childhood growth and offspring birthweight: pooled analyses from four birth cohorts in low and middle income countries
Parental childhood growth and offspring birthweight: pooled analyses from four birth cohorts in low and middle income countries
OBJECTIVE:

Associations between parental and offspring size at birth are well established, but the relative importance of parental growth at different ages as predictors of offspring birthweight is less certain. Here we model parental birthweight and postnatal conditional growth in specific age periods as predictors of offspring birthweight.

METHODS:

We analyzed data from 3,392 adults participating in four prospective birth cohorts and 5,506 of their offspring.

RESULTS:

There was no significant heterogeneity by study site or offspring sex. 1SD increase in maternal birthweight was associated with offspring birthweight increases of 102 g, 1SD in maternal length growth 0-2 year with 46 g, and 1SD in maternal height growth Mid-childhood (MC)-adulthood with 27 g. Maternal relative weight measures were associated with 24 g offspring birth weight increases (2 year- MC) and 49 g for MC-adulthood period but not with earlier relative weight 0-2 year. For fathers, birthweight, and linear/length growth from 0-2 year were associated with increases of 57 and 56 g in offspring birthweight, respectively but not thereafter.

CONCLUSIONS:

Maternal and paternal birthweight and growth from birth to 2 year each predict offspring birthweight. Maternal growth from MC-adulthood, relative weight from 2-MC and MC-adulthood also predict offspring birthweight. These findings suggest that shared genes and/or adequate nutrition during early life for both parents may confer benefits to the next generation, and highlight the importance of maternal height and weight prior to conception. The stronger matrilineal than patrilineal relationships with offspring birth weight are consistent with the hypothesis that improving the early growth conditions of young females can improve birth outcomes in the next generation.
1042-0533
99-105
Addo, O.Y.
df71a19b-884e-45d0-b6dc-fa9b641c1904
Stein, A.D.
9120fff8-4ef6-4c07-a69f-ebe55dcb1243
Fall, C.H.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Gigante, D.P.
08d63acc-872c-4231-8546-e35d2b7049f0
Guntupalli, A.M.
e41fb072-c8a9-461f-9b49-73fb41739ac2
Horta, B.L.
c1c0cf75-59af-47f3-8e02-20297f95bc1f
Kuzawa, C.W.
783f0645-d899-4a33-98ee-d964852e67ff
Lee, N.
78a65697-823f-4128-bfa2-cc9443403e07
Norris, S.A.
0f6066b6-036e-4606-8cd2-ae7a2fbdbd73
Osmond, C.
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Prabhakaran, P.
0a38097e-6100-40df-b944-eb12fd854f27
Richter, L.M.
c76cf803-b586-4bc9-b82a-1dd6f16b65f4
Sachdev, H.P.S.
8667f0cc-a69a-4f5d-b140-14e06edd7894
Martorell, R.
9ee73323-0528-4eff-93e3-c96fb1067356
Addo, O.Y.
df71a19b-884e-45d0-b6dc-fa9b641c1904
Stein, A.D.
9120fff8-4ef6-4c07-a69f-ebe55dcb1243
Fall, C.H.
7171a105-34f5-4131-89d7-1aa639893b18
Gigante, D.P.
08d63acc-872c-4231-8546-e35d2b7049f0
Guntupalli, A.M.
e41fb072-c8a9-461f-9b49-73fb41739ac2
Horta, B.L.
c1c0cf75-59af-47f3-8e02-20297f95bc1f
Kuzawa, C.W.
783f0645-d899-4a33-98ee-d964852e67ff
Lee, N.
78a65697-823f-4128-bfa2-cc9443403e07
Norris, S.A.
0f6066b6-036e-4606-8cd2-ae7a2fbdbd73
Osmond, C.
2677bf85-494f-4a78-adf8-580e1b8acb81
Prabhakaran, P.
0a38097e-6100-40df-b944-eb12fd854f27
Richter, L.M.
c76cf803-b586-4bc9-b82a-1dd6f16b65f4
Sachdev, H.P.S.
8667f0cc-a69a-4f5d-b140-14e06edd7894
Martorell, R.
9ee73323-0528-4eff-93e3-c96fb1067356

Addo, O.Y., Stein, A.D., Fall, C.H., Gigante, D.P., Guntupalli, A.M., Horta, B.L., Kuzawa, C.W., Lee, N., Norris, S.A., Osmond, C., Prabhakaran, P., Richter, L.M., Sachdev, H.P.S. and Martorell, R. (2015) Parental childhood growth and offspring birthweight: pooled analyses from four birth cohorts in low and middle income countries. American Journal of Human Biology, 27 (1), 99-105. (doi:10.1002/ajhb.22614). (PMID:25186666)

Record type: Article

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Associations between parental and offspring size at birth are well established, but the relative importance of parental growth at different ages as predictors of offspring birthweight is less certain. Here we model parental birthweight and postnatal conditional growth in specific age periods as predictors of offspring birthweight.

METHODS:

We analyzed data from 3,392 adults participating in four prospective birth cohorts and 5,506 of their offspring.

RESULTS:

There was no significant heterogeneity by study site or offspring sex. 1SD increase in maternal birthweight was associated with offspring birthweight increases of 102 g, 1SD in maternal length growth 0-2 year with 46 g, and 1SD in maternal height growth Mid-childhood (MC)-adulthood with 27 g. Maternal relative weight measures were associated with 24 g offspring birth weight increases (2 year- MC) and 49 g for MC-adulthood period but not with earlier relative weight 0-2 year. For fathers, birthweight, and linear/length growth from 0-2 year were associated with increases of 57 and 56 g in offspring birthweight, respectively but not thereafter.

CONCLUSIONS:

Maternal and paternal birthweight and growth from birth to 2 year each predict offspring birthweight. Maternal growth from MC-adulthood, relative weight from 2-MC and MC-adulthood also predict offspring birthweight. These findings suggest that shared genes and/or adequate nutrition during early life for both parents may confer benefits to the next generation, and highlight the importance of maternal height and weight prior to conception. The stronger matrilineal than patrilineal relationships with offspring birth weight are consistent with the hypothesis that improving the early growth conditions of young females can improve birth outcomes in the next generation.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 August 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 September 2014
Published date: January 2015
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374630
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374630
ISSN: 1042-0533
PURE UUID: 38403cce-7f8d-48a6-9abb-3665ab851d66
ORCID for C. Osmond: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9054-4655

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 25 Feb 2015 15:50
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:04

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Contributors

Author: O.Y. Addo
Author: A.D. Stein
Author: C.H. Fall
Author: D.P. Gigante
Author: A.M. Guntupalli
Author: B.L. Horta
Author: C.W. Kuzawa
Author: N. Lee
Author: S.A. Norris
Author: C. Osmond ORCID iD
Author: P. Prabhakaran
Author: L.M. Richter
Author: H.P.S. Sachdev
Author: R. Martorell

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