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Daytime intrusive thoughts and poor sleep

Daytime intrusive thoughts and poor sleep
Daytime intrusive thoughts and poor sleep
Insomnia is increasingly recognized as a 24 hour complaint that is associated with an increased risk of mood and anxiety disorders. However, the effects of insomnia symptoms on maladaptive daytime patterns of thinking are poorly understood. We examined the relationship between subjective insomnia symptoms, attentional control and negative thought intrusions during daytime in a large sample of undergraduates experiencing disturbed sleep. A total of 109 participants completed self-report measures of sleep quality, current sleepiness, anxiety and attentional control. A behavioural measure of intrusive thought required participants to control their attention during two focus periods separated by a five-minute period of self-referential worry. Thought intrusions were sampled throughout the pre- and post-worry periods. Perceived insomnia severity was associated with the reduced ability to focus attention and uniquely associated with increased negative thought intrusions in the pre-worry period. These results support suggestions that acute episodes of poor sleep can dysregulate key networks involved in attentional control and emotion regulation, and that promote negative cognitive activity.
Baker, L.
04452f3e-c817-4657-a717-f535e1378d73
Baldwin, D.S.
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Garner, M.
3221c5b3-b951-4fec-b456-ec449e4ce072
Baker, L.
04452f3e-c817-4657-a717-f535e1378d73
Baldwin, D.S.
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Garner, M.
3221c5b3-b951-4fec-b456-ec449e4ce072

Baker, L., Baldwin, D.S. and Garner, M. (2015) Daytime intrusive thoughts and poor sleep. Psychiatry Research.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Insomnia is increasingly recognized as a 24 hour complaint that is associated with an increased risk of mood and anxiety disorders. However, the effects of insomnia symptoms on maladaptive daytime patterns of thinking are poorly understood. We examined the relationship between subjective insomnia symptoms, attentional control and negative thought intrusions during daytime in a large sample of undergraduates experiencing disturbed sleep. A total of 109 participants completed self-report measures of sleep quality, current sleepiness, anxiety and attentional control. A behavioural measure of intrusive thought required participants to control their attention during two focus periods separated by a five-minute period of self-referential worry. Thought intrusions were sampled throughout the pre- and post-worry periods. Perceived insomnia severity was associated with the reduced ability to focus attention and uniquely associated with increased negative thought intrusions in the pre-worry period. These results support suggestions that acute episodes of poor sleep can dysregulate key networks involved in attentional control and emotion regulation, and that promote negative cognitive activity.

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Accepted/In Press date: 2015
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

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Local EPrints ID: 374669
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374669
PURE UUID: cb2c54b2-6350-4a83-93a5-c8b1b76d8dec

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Date deposited: 26 Feb 2015 11:57
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:25

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