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An improvement of the concept design analysis method by the use of the avoidance function

An improvement of the concept design analysis method by the use of the avoidance function
An improvement of the concept design analysis method by the use of the avoidance function
Avoiding disasters due to resonance is a major concern in construction projects such as buildings, bridges and pipelines. This paper uses the Concept Design Analysis (CODA) method that is capable of supporting the described Value-Driven Design (VDD) methodology. While VDD promotes the use of a system wide ‘value’ function during conceptual design, the CODA method allows mapping customer needs into engineering characteristics in order to calculate a single normalized design metric. The CODA method employs three different merit functions: maximizing (more is better), minimizing (less is better), and optimizing (target is better). This paper proposes a new merit function called avoidance function that allows excluding a range of engineering characteristics, e.g. avoiding a range of resonant frequencies. An example of a simple CODA model for a bicycle wheel design selection with the proposed the avoidance function is presented.
customer needs, design merit, design optimization, value-driven design, CODA method, merit function, avoidance function
Khamukhin, A. A.
368dc681-13d6-49f4-9b96-90cc7cd7c204
Eres, M.H.
b22e2d66-55c4-46d2-8ec3-46317033de43
Khamukhin, A. A.
368dc681-13d6-49f4-9b96-90cc7cd7c204
Eres, M.H.
b22e2d66-55c4-46d2-8ec3-46317033de43

(2014) An improvement of the concept design analysis method by the use of the avoidance function. International Conference on Mechanical Engineering, Automation and Control Systems 2014, Russian Federation. 16 - 18 Oct 2014. (In Press)

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Avoiding disasters due to resonance is a major concern in construction projects such as buildings, bridges and pipelines. This paper uses the Concept Design Analysis (CODA) method that is capable of supporting the described Value-Driven Design (VDD) methodology. While VDD promotes the use of a system wide ‘value’ function during conceptual design, the CODA method allows mapping customer needs into engineering characteristics in order to calculate a single normalized design metric. The CODA method employs three different merit functions: maximizing (more is better), minimizing (less is better), and optimizing (target is better). This paper proposes a new merit function called avoidance function that allows excluding a range of engineering characteristics, e.g. avoiding a range of resonant frequencies. An example of a simple CODA model for a bicycle wheel design selection with the proposed the avoidance function is presented.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 December 2014
Venue - Dates: International Conference on Mechanical Engineering, Automation and Control Systems 2014, Russian Federation, 2014-10-16 - 2014-10-18
Keywords: customer needs, design merit, design optimization, value-driven design, CODA method, merit function, avoidance function
Organisations: Computational Engineering & Design Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374694
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374694
PURE UUID: 6c6fd818-4335-4bcc-85f8-b1cd9077503f
ORCID for M.H. Eres: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4967-0833

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Feb 2015 14:15
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:00

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