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An early start to French literacy: learning the spoken and written word simultaneously in English primary schools Volume 1 of 2

An early start to French literacy: learning the spoken and written word simultaneously in English primary schools Volume 1 of 2
An early start to French literacy: learning the spoken and written word simultaneously in English primary schools Volume 1 of 2
The Primary MFL curriculum (DfE, 2013: 1-3) calls for the development of reading and writing in a foreign language in primary schools. Specific attainment targets refer to “accurate reading aloud..for understanding” and the ability to “describe people, places, things and actions orally and in writing” (DfE, 2013: 2). Research, however, has shown both the teaching and learning of MFL literacy to be most problematic. Observation-derived evidence noted that writing was the “least developed skill” in primary MFL provision (Ofsted, 2011: 10, 25) and that written work tended to provide consolidation and support for oral learning (Cable, Driscoll, Mitchell, Sing, Cremin, Earl, Eyres, Holmes, Martin & Heins, 2010: 87). Meanwhile, empirical evidence holds that a lack achievement and motivation in school-based language learning is a reflection of limited progression in second language literacy and decoding (Erler, 2003; Macaro & Erler, 2008; 2011).
Despite these findings, research has yet to identify teaching and learning approaches which could shape pedagogical practice and deliver the “substantial progress” that the curriculum expects (DfE, 2013: 2). This action research study, conducted over 23 weeks, presents an empirically-derived, principled and systematic approach to teaching MFL literacy and oracy simultaneously. Qualitative and quantitative data, collected throughout the intervention and at pre-, post- and delayed post-test allowed for both detailed statistical analyses of learning outcomes and the exploration of the learning process.
The study finds that, in this beginner learner setting, MFL oracy is not disrupted by the simultaneous introduction of MFL literacy. It notes that both L1 reading age and verbal working memory proficiency are highly influential in L2 oracy and literacy learning but reports that learners across the L1 ability range can participate in L2 learning and make meaningful progress. It further suggests that the development of L2 sound/spelling links (through systematic phonics instruction) is slow and that familiar words are more likely to be successfully recoded. These findings together
ii
with evidence of an ever-dominant L1, support an argument for an early start to MFL literacy.
Porter, Alison
978474c5-8b0b-4dc6-8463-3fd68162d0cd
Porter, Alison
978474c5-8b0b-4dc6-8463-3fd68162d0cd
Mitchell, Rosamond
de2eabed-7903-43fa-961a-c16f69fddd7e
BUDACH, GABRIELE
0ef7057b-886a-4821-bf3d-50b2ca84e1b1
Rule, Sarah
81970997-971e-4613-adf5-69a6a627819c

Porter, Alison (2014) An early start to French literacy: learning the spoken and written word simultaneously in English primary schools Volume 1 of 2. University of Southampton, Faculty of Humanities, Doctoral Thesis, 226pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The Primary MFL curriculum (DfE, 2013: 1-3) calls for the development of reading and writing in a foreign language in primary schools. Specific attainment targets refer to “accurate reading aloud..for understanding” and the ability to “describe people, places, things and actions orally and in writing” (DfE, 2013: 2). Research, however, has shown both the teaching and learning of MFL literacy to be most problematic. Observation-derived evidence noted that writing was the “least developed skill” in primary MFL provision (Ofsted, 2011: 10, 25) and that written work tended to provide consolidation and support for oral learning (Cable, Driscoll, Mitchell, Sing, Cremin, Earl, Eyres, Holmes, Martin & Heins, 2010: 87). Meanwhile, empirical evidence holds that a lack achievement and motivation in school-based language learning is a reflection of limited progression in second language literacy and decoding (Erler, 2003; Macaro & Erler, 2008; 2011).
Despite these findings, research has yet to identify teaching and learning approaches which could shape pedagogical practice and deliver the “substantial progress” that the curriculum expects (DfE, 2013: 2). This action research study, conducted over 23 weeks, presents an empirically-derived, principled and systematic approach to teaching MFL literacy and oracy simultaneously. Qualitative and quantitative data, collected throughout the intervention and at pre-, post- and delayed post-test allowed for both detailed statistical analyses of learning outcomes and the exploration of the learning process.
The study finds that, in this beginner learner setting, MFL oracy is not disrupted by the simultaneous introduction of MFL literacy. It notes that both L1 reading age and verbal working memory proficiency are highly influential in L2 oracy and literacy learning but reports that learners across the L1 ability range can participate in L2 learning and make meaningful progress. It further suggests that the development of L2 sound/spelling links (through systematic phonics instruction) is slow and that familiar words are more likely to be successfully recoded. These findings together
ii
with evidence of an ever-dominant L1, support an argument for an early start to MFL literacy.

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A M Porter FINAL THESIS FRONT, LIT REVIEW, METH.pdf - Other
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AM Porter FINAL Appendices.pdf - Other
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AM Porter FINAL THESIS RESULTS DISCUSSION CONCLUSION BIBLIOGRAPHY.pdf - Other
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More information

Published date: February 2014
Organisations: University of Southampton, Modern Languages

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374731
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374731
PURE UUID: 9b24e93c-52f8-47ba-a2fb-69a028920f2f
ORCID for Alison Porter: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8462-1909

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Mar 2015 14:19
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:30

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Contributors

Author: Alison Porter ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Rosamond Mitchell
Thesis advisor: GABRIELE BUDACH
Thesis advisor: Sarah Rule

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