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Infant feeding effects on early neurocognitive development in Asian children

Infant feeding effects on early neurocognitive development in Asian children
Infant feeding effects on early neurocognitive development in Asian children
Background: breastfeeding has been shown to enhance global measures of intelligence in children. However, few studies have examined associations between breastfeeding and specific cognitive task performance in the first 2 y of life, particularly in an Asian population.

Objective: we assessed associations between early infant feeding and detailed measures of cognitive development in the first 2 y of life in healthy Asian children born at term.

Design: in a prospective cohort study, neurocognitive testing was performed in 408 healthy children (aged 6, 18, and 24 mo) from uncomplicated pregnancies (i.e., birth weight >2500 and <4000 g, gestational age ?37 wk, and 5-min Apgar score ?9). Tests included memory (deferred imitation, relational binding, habituation) and attention tasks (visual expectation, auditory oddball) as well as the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (BSID-III). Children were stratified into 3 groups (low, intermediate, and high) on the basis of breastfeeding duration and exclusivity.

Results: after potential confounding variables were controlled for, significant associations and dose-response relations were observed for 4 of the 15 tests. Higher breastfeeding exposure was associated with better memory at 6 mo, demonstrated by greater preferential looking toward correctly matched items during early portions of a relational memory task (i.e., relational binding task: P-trend = 0.015 and 0.050 for the first two 1000-ms time bins, respectively). No effects of breastfeeding were observed at 18 mo. At 24 mo, breastfed children were more likely to display sequential memory during a deferred imitation memory task (P-trend = 0.048), and toddlers with more exposure to breastfeeding scored higher in receptive language [+0.93 (0.23, 1.63) and +1.08 (0.10, 2.07) for intermediate- and high-breastfeeding groups, respectively, compared with the low-breastfeeding group], as well as expressive language [+0.58 (?0.06, 1.23) and +1.22 (0.32, 2.12) for intermediate- and high-breastfeeding groups, respectively] assessed via the BSID-III.

Conclusions: our findings suggest small but significant benefits of breastfeeding for some aspects of memory and language development in the first 2 y of life, with significant improvements in only 4 of 15 indicators. Whether the implicated processes confer developmental advantages is unknown and represents an important area for future research
0002-9165
326-336
Cai, S.
a59dfc48-a146-4da1-b49d-a03bf3e26041
Pang, W.W.
ea58c80d-6316-4143-ad93-113b3b0c2072
Low, Y.L.
e53555c6-9324-44e1-969d-35882ea3c955
Sim, L.W.
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Sam, S.C.
e3db58dd-47a8-4cc2-ae8b-351a6a328a23
Bruntraeger, M.B.
71c0f805-3bb7-4d03-8aac-a806196147b1
Wong, E.Q.
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Fok, D.
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Broekman, B.F.
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Singh, L.
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Richmond, J.
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Agarwal, P.
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Qiu, A.
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Saw, S.M.
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Yap, F.
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Godfrey, K.M.
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Gluckman, P.D.
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Chong, Y.S.
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Meaney, M.J.
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Kramer, M.S.
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Rifkin-Graboi, A.
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Cai, S.
a59dfc48-a146-4da1-b49d-a03bf3e26041
Pang, W.W.
ea58c80d-6316-4143-ad93-113b3b0c2072
Low, Y.L.
e53555c6-9324-44e1-969d-35882ea3c955
Sim, L.W.
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Sam, S.C.
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Bruntraeger, M.B.
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Wong, E.Q.
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Fok, D.
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Broekman, B.F.
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Singh, L.
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Richmond, J.
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Agarwal, P.
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Qiu, A.
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Saw, S.M.
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Yap, F.
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Godfrey, K.M.
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Gluckman, P.D.
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Chong, Y.S.
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Meaney, M.J.
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Kramer, M.S.
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Rifkin-Graboi, A.
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Cai, S., Pang, W.W., Low, Y.L., Sim, L.W., Sam, S.C., Bruntraeger, M.B., Wong, E.Q., Fok, D., Broekman, B.F., Singh, L., Richmond, J., Agarwal, P., Qiu, A., Saw, S.M., Yap, F., Godfrey, K.M., Gluckman, P.D., Chong, Y.S., Meaney, M.J., Kramer, M.S. and Rifkin-Graboi, A. (2015) Infant feeding effects on early neurocognitive development in Asian children. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101 (2), 326-336. (doi:10.3945/ajcn.114.095414.). (PMID:25646330 )

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: breastfeeding has been shown to enhance global measures of intelligence in children. However, few studies have examined associations between breastfeeding and specific cognitive task performance in the first 2 y of life, particularly in an Asian population.

Objective: we assessed associations between early infant feeding and detailed measures of cognitive development in the first 2 y of life in healthy Asian children born at term.

Design: in a prospective cohort study, neurocognitive testing was performed in 408 healthy children (aged 6, 18, and 24 mo) from uncomplicated pregnancies (i.e., birth weight >2500 and <4000 g, gestational age ?37 wk, and 5-min Apgar score ?9). Tests included memory (deferred imitation, relational binding, habituation) and attention tasks (visual expectation, auditory oddball) as well as the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (BSID-III). Children were stratified into 3 groups (low, intermediate, and high) on the basis of breastfeeding duration and exclusivity.

Results: after potential confounding variables were controlled for, significant associations and dose-response relations were observed for 4 of the 15 tests. Higher breastfeeding exposure was associated with better memory at 6 mo, demonstrated by greater preferential looking toward correctly matched items during early portions of a relational memory task (i.e., relational binding task: P-trend = 0.015 and 0.050 for the first two 1000-ms time bins, respectively). No effects of breastfeeding were observed at 18 mo. At 24 mo, breastfed children were more likely to display sequential memory during a deferred imitation memory task (P-trend = 0.048), and toddlers with more exposure to breastfeeding scored higher in receptive language [+0.93 (0.23, 1.63) and +1.08 (0.10, 2.07) for intermediate- and high-breastfeeding groups, respectively, compared with the low-breastfeeding group], as well as expressive language [+0.58 (?0.06, 1.23) and +1.22 (0.32, 2.12) for intermediate- and high-breastfeeding groups, respectively] assessed via the BSID-III.

Conclusions: our findings suggest small but significant benefits of breastfeeding for some aspects of memory and language development in the first 2 y of life, with significant improvements in only 4 of 15 indicators. Whether the implicated processes confer developmental advantages is unknown and represents an important area for future research

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Published date: February 2015
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374895
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374895
ISSN: 0002-9165
PURE UUID: c4cf697f-5b15-4506-977e-a92bef295f44
ORCID for K.M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

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Date deposited: 06 Mar 2015 08:52
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:22

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Contributors

Author: S. Cai
Author: W.W. Pang
Author: Y.L. Low
Author: L.W. Sim
Author: S.C. Sam
Author: M.B. Bruntraeger
Author: E.Q. Wong
Author: D. Fok
Author: B.F. Broekman
Author: L. Singh
Author: J. Richmond
Author: P. Agarwal
Author: A. Qiu
Author: S.M. Saw
Author: F. Yap
Author: K.M. Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: P.D. Gluckman
Author: Y.S. Chong
Author: M.J. Meaney
Author: M.S. Kramer
Author: A. Rifkin-Graboi

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