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Arabic/English symbol dictionary: early challenges and technological opportunities

Arabic/English symbol dictionary: early challenges and technological opportunities
Arabic/English symbol dictionary: early challenges and technological opportunities
Over the last ten years there has been an expansion in the number of symbol sets available to Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) users, their therapists, teachers and carers. They have tended to be developed in USA or Europe with English or European language word lists, although some have other language options including Arabic. The problem is that few show the traits of true localisation where solutions have to be found for “the differences between cultures and the problems that are likely to occur because of these differences” (Evers et al., 2000). Researchers have shown in relation to symbol use for communication that it is important to have:

• translucency (How appropriate is a proposed symbol for a suggested meaning?) (Bloomberg et al. 1990),
• guessability (Can subjects guess the intended meaning of a symbol?) (Hanson & Hartzema 1995, Dowse & Ehlers 2001,2003), and
• iconicity (How distinctive are the symbols?) (Haupt & Alant 2003).

Simple language translations may offer word for word matching within the lexicons, but they tend to miss the issues of local colloquial vocabulary, cultural, social and environmental differences which can all impact on the speed of communication especially when using many inappropriate icons, pictorgrams and other types of imagery to support dialogue and literacy skills.
0969-9554
26-28
Draffan, E.A.
021d4f4e-d269-4379-ba5a-7e2ffb73d2bf
Kadous, Amatullah
2b86612f-796e-4291-995e-100680b9cbb7
Amal, Idris
b14910da-29da-4ed9-a11b-fa84a7e19c57
Zahid, Aejaz
12c91c3c-d028-4829-9738-4d1218235aca
Zeinoin, Nadine
ddd2fdfc-8636-430d-99df-b57f052f9726
Wald, Mike
90577cfd-35ae-4e4a-9422-5acffecd89d5
Halabi, Nawar
f94f4bac-9456-4648-ae6c-dbf99f966219
Draffan, E.A.
021d4f4e-d269-4379-ba5a-7e2ffb73d2bf
Kadous, Amatullah
2b86612f-796e-4291-995e-100680b9cbb7
Amal, Idris
b14910da-29da-4ed9-a11b-fa84a7e19c57
Zahid, Aejaz
12c91c3c-d028-4829-9738-4d1218235aca
Zeinoin, Nadine
ddd2fdfc-8636-430d-99df-b57f052f9726
Wald, Mike
90577cfd-35ae-4e4a-9422-5acffecd89d5
Halabi, Nawar
f94f4bac-9456-4648-ae6c-dbf99f966219

Draffan, E.A., Kadous, Amatullah, Amal, Idris, Zahid, Aejaz, Zeinoin, Nadine, Wald, Mike and Halabi, Nawar (2014) Arabic/English symbol dictionary: early challenges and technological opportunities. Communication Matters, 28 (3), 26-28.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Over the last ten years there has been an expansion in the number of symbol sets available to Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) users, their therapists, teachers and carers. They have tended to be developed in USA or Europe with English or European language word lists, although some have other language options including Arabic. The problem is that few show the traits of true localisation where solutions have to be found for “the differences between cultures and the problems that are likely to occur because of these differences” (Evers et al., 2000). Researchers have shown in relation to symbol use for communication that it is important to have:

• translucency (How appropriate is a proposed symbol for a suggested meaning?) (Bloomberg et al. 1990),
• guessability (Can subjects guess the intended meaning of a symbol?) (Hanson & Hartzema 1995, Dowse & Ehlers 2001,2003), and
• iconicity (How distinctive are the symbols?) (Haupt & Alant 2003).

Simple language translations may offer word for word matching within the lexicons, but they tend to miss the issues of local colloquial vocabulary, cultural, social and environmental differences which can all impact on the speed of communication especially when using many inappropriate icons, pictorgrams and other types of imagery to support dialogue and literacy skills.

PDF Arabic Symbol Dictionary CM2014 paperfinal.pdf - Author's Original
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More information

Published date: November 2014
Organisations: Web & Internet Science

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374898
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374898
ISSN: 0969-9554
PURE UUID: 18f14a82-6b90-409b-9878-312fb12718ba

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Date deposited: 04 Aug 2015 13:33
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:22

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Contributors

Author: E.A. Draffan
Author: Amatullah Kadous
Author: Idris Amal
Author: Aejaz Zahid
Author: Nadine Zeinoin
Author: Mike Wald
Author: Nawar Halabi

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