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Tensile and hydraulic properties of geosynthetics after mechanical damage and abrasion laboratory tests

Tensile and hydraulic properties of geosynthetics after mechanical damage and abrasion laboratory tests
Tensile and hydraulic properties of geosynthetics after mechanical damage and abrasion laboratory tests
Installation damage of geosynthetics occurs during their handling, positioning on the ground and the placing and compacting of fill material. Abrasion is a common damage mechanism where there is cyclic relative motion (friction) between a geosynthetic and contact soil. This paper presents the laboratory test results of mechanical damage and abrasion performed on six geosynthetics. The in isolation and combined effects on mechanical, hydraulic and physical properties of the geosynthetics were assessed. Results show that the effects of induced mechanical and abrasion damage essentially depend on the geosynthetic structure. For the most affected materials, strength losses after abrasion (in isolation and combined with mechanical damage) are higher than after the induced mechanical damage. Therefore, for most geosynthetics studied, abrasion is the conditioning mechanism which most affects their tensile strength. An increase of the characteristic opening size of the geosynthetics was observed, while their permittivity did not increase. This may be caused by differences in the test set-ups.
geosynthetics, mechanical damage, abrasion, tensile strength, permittivity, characteristic opening size, laboratory tests
1072-6349
358-374
Rosete, A.
990a36ec-1728-4c77-bc13-6f79a253f6d9
Pinho-Lopes, M.
b7e5f7d6-90d8-48cc-b991-0495445fcea4
Lopes, M.L.
dca0c06e-aaa8-47df-923f-5fa9973552ba
Rosete, A.
990a36ec-1728-4c77-bc13-6f79a253f6d9
Pinho-Lopes, M.
b7e5f7d6-90d8-48cc-b991-0495445fcea4
Lopes, M.L.
dca0c06e-aaa8-47df-923f-5fa9973552ba

Rosete, A., Pinho-Lopes, M. and Lopes, M.L. (2013) Tensile and hydraulic properties of geosynthetics after mechanical damage and abrasion laboratory tests. Geosynthetics International, 20 (5), 358-374. (doi:10.1680/gein.13.00022).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Installation damage of geosynthetics occurs during their handling, positioning on the ground and the placing and compacting of fill material. Abrasion is a common damage mechanism where there is cyclic relative motion (friction) between a geosynthetic and contact soil. This paper presents the laboratory test results of mechanical damage and abrasion performed on six geosynthetics. The in isolation and combined effects on mechanical, hydraulic and physical properties of the geosynthetics were assessed. Results show that the effects of induced mechanical and abrasion damage essentially depend on the geosynthetic structure. For the most affected materials, strength losses after abrasion (in isolation and combined with mechanical damage) are higher than after the induced mechanical damage. Therefore, for most geosynthetics studied, abrasion is the conditioning mechanism which most affects their tensile strength. An increase of the characteristic opening size of the geosynthetics was observed, while their permittivity did not increase. This may be caused by differences in the test set-ups.

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Published date: 1 October 2013
Keywords: geosynthetics, mechanical damage, abrasion, tensile strength, permittivity, characteristic opening size, laboratory tests
Organisations: Infrastructure Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 374946
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/374946
ISSN: 1072-6349
PURE UUID: b89dc71e-1a20-46d3-8741-8be4cac0effd
ORCID for M. Pinho-Lopes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0808-6307

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Mar 2015 10:52
Last modified: 31 Jul 2019 00:34

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Contributors

Author: A. Rosete
Author: M. Pinho-Lopes ORCID iD
Author: M.L. Lopes

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