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Panel. Considering complexity in ELF research. 'Tolerable error'-understanding the complexity

Panel. Considering complexity in ELF research. 'Tolerable error'-understanding the complexity
Panel. Considering complexity in ELF research. 'Tolerable error'-understanding the complexity
In the field of ELF research, an overarching question is why native English should be followed by all users around the world despite wide diversity in terms of purposes of communication and identity projection. Influenced by the ELF perspective, I argue for the legitimacy of Chinese speakers’ own English, which is traditionally judged as ‘learner English’ due to its difference from native English. In order to do so, I consider the English used by Chinese speakers for lingua franca purpose as a variety, and I label it as Chinese speakers’ English as a Lingua Franca (CHELF). Different from the Kachruvian focus on a geographically defined variety, the notion of CHELF is based on Chinese users’ L1 cultural identity projected in their engagement with intercultural encounters. Given the significance of attitudinal study for the understanding of NNES varieties, I investigate Chinese speakers’ perceptions of their ELF in order to make sense of the possibility of CHELF developing into its legitimacy. With the data collected among both university students and professionals, the study demonstrates the complexity of attitudes, identities and beliefs held by the participants, illuminating contrast, complementation, uncertainty and conservation in their perceptions related to their ELF.
In this presentation, I will discuss how I conceptualize CHELF and report part of the study, with the focus on the establishment of contextual factors that were identified through interviews and focus groups to have roles to play in influencing, shaping and developing the participants’ perceptions of CHELF. In particular, a good understanding of ELF conception was found to make a difference in the participants’ confidence in relation to CHELF. Thus, the presentation will not only highlight the point that agency is socially constructed but also add evidence to support the inclusion of ELF concept in pedagogy.
Wang, Ying
dae44497-8e51-48ab-8173-7844f152f6e9
Wang, Ying
dae44497-8e51-48ab-8173-7844f152f6e9

Wang, Ying (2012) Panel. Considering complexity in ELF research. 'Tolerable error'-understanding the complexity. The Fifth International Conference of English as a Lingua Franca, Turkey. 24 - 25 May 2012.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

In the field of ELF research, an overarching question is why native English should be followed by all users around the world despite wide diversity in terms of purposes of communication and identity projection. Influenced by the ELF perspective, I argue for the legitimacy of Chinese speakers’ own English, which is traditionally judged as ‘learner English’ due to its difference from native English. In order to do so, I consider the English used by Chinese speakers for lingua franca purpose as a variety, and I label it as Chinese speakers’ English as a Lingua Franca (CHELF). Different from the Kachruvian focus on a geographically defined variety, the notion of CHELF is based on Chinese users’ L1 cultural identity projected in their engagement with intercultural encounters. Given the significance of attitudinal study for the understanding of NNES varieties, I investigate Chinese speakers’ perceptions of their ELF in order to make sense of the possibility of CHELF developing into its legitimacy. With the data collected among both university students and professionals, the study demonstrates the complexity of attitudes, identities and beliefs held by the participants, illuminating contrast, complementation, uncertainty and conservation in their perceptions related to their ELF.
In this presentation, I will discuss how I conceptualize CHELF and report part of the study, with the focus on the establishment of contextual factors that were identified through interviews and focus groups to have roles to play in influencing, shaping and developing the participants’ perceptions of CHELF. In particular, a good understanding of ELF conception was found to make a difference in the participants’ confidence in relation to CHELF. Thus, the presentation will not only highlight the point that agency is socially constructed but also add evidence to support the inclusion of ELF concept in pedagogy.

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More information

Published date: May 2012
Venue - Dates: The Fifth International Conference of English as a Lingua Franca, Turkey, 2012-05-24 - 2012-05-25
Organisations: Modern Languages

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 375001
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/375001
PURE UUID: fd846098-5cfe-448b-994c-323a6c81b846

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Date deposited: 10 Mar 2015 13:59
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:21

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Contributors

Author: Ying Wang

University divisions

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