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The danger of subverting students’ views in schools

The danger of subverting students’ views in schools
The danger of subverting students’ views in schools
This paper is firmly grounded in the position that engaging with students’ voices in schools is central to the development of inclusive practices. It explores the tensions that can be created when efforts are made to engage with students’ voices in relation to their experiences of learning and teaching. An example from a three-year research and development project, which worked alongside teachers to use students’ voices as a way of developing inclusive practices, is used to illustrate these tensions. This project, though showing that students’ voices can be a powerful means for understanding learning and teaching in schools, also encountered challenges with these processes. This paper focuses on the experiences of one secondary school which (possibly inadvertently) subverted and undermined students’ voice initiatives and explores the potential negative impacts of this on individual students, on students as a whole, and on teacher development. By doing this, suggestions as to how such tensions can be avoided in schools are offered, with the aim being to allow a genuine engagement with the views of students.
students’ voices, inclusive education, subversion, teacher development, schools
1360-3116
1009-1021
Messiou, Kyriaki
6b3cb19d-a4de-4380-9326-80167b2dda7c
Hope, Max A.
d5f98670-9687-414c-b154-5ef0565fe1d7
Messiou, Kyriaki
6b3cb19d-a4de-4380-9326-80167b2dda7c
Hope, Max A.
d5f98670-9687-414c-b154-5ef0565fe1d7

Messiou, Kyriaki and Hope, Max A. (2015) The danger of subverting students’ views in schools. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 19 (10), 1009-1021. (doi:10.1080/13603116.2015.1024763).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This paper is firmly grounded in the position that engaging with students’ voices in schools is central to the development of inclusive practices. It explores the tensions that can be created when efforts are made to engage with students’ voices in relation to their experiences of learning and teaching. An example from a three-year research and development project, which worked alongside teachers to use students’ voices as a way of developing inclusive practices, is used to illustrate these tensions. This project, though showing that students’ voices can be a powerful means for understanding learning and teaching in schools, also encountered challenges with these processes. This paper focuses on the experiences of one secondary school which (possibly inadvertently) subverted and undermined students’ voice initiatives and explores the potential negative impacts of this on individual students, on students as a whole, and on teacher development. By doing this, suggestions as to how such tensions can be avoided in schools are offered, with the aim being to allow a genuine engagement with the views of students.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 February 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 March 2015
Published date: 2015
Keywords: students’ voices, inclusive education, subversion, teacher development, schools
Organisations: Southampton Education School

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 375176
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/375176
ISSN: 1360-3116
PURE UUID: 5797f7ef-a9f8-46dc-bcc5-62db10836bbe
ORCID for Kyriaki Messiou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3412-3108

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Mar 2015 14:31
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 08:41

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Contributors

Author: Kyriaki Messiou ORCID iD
Author: Max A. Hope

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