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Patient outcomes in association with significant other responses to chronic fatigue syndrome: a systematic review of the literature

Patient outcomes in association with significant other responses to chronic fatigue syndrome: a systematic review of the literature
Patient outcomes in association with significant other responses to chronic fatigue syndrome: a systematic review of the literature
Social processes have been suggested as important in the maintenance of chronic fatigue syndrome (also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis; CFS/ME), but the specific role of close interpersonal relationships remains unclear. We reviewed 14 articles investigating significant other responses to close others with CFS/ME and the relationships between these responses and patient outcomes. Significant other beliefs attributing patient responsibility for the onset and ongoing symptoms of CFS/ME were associated with increased patient distress. Increased symptom severity, disability, and distress were also associated with both solicitous and negative significant other responses. Specific aspects of dyadic relationship quality, including high Expressed Emotion, were identified as important. We propose extending current theoretical models of CFS/ME to include two potential perpetuating interpersonal processes; the evidence reviewed suggests that the development of significant other–focused interventions may also be beneficial.
behaviors, beliefs, chronic fatigue syndrome, significant others
0969-5893
29-46
Band, Rebecca
be8901bb-bb1b-4131-8e19-c1d4a3bdfb8d
Wearden, Alison
57425d54-35b4-450e-8deb-ab18cd7016dc
Barrowclough, Christine
bc8a2cfa-c710-4f40-8603-3e1e674adb0c
Band, Rebecca
be8901bb-bb1b-4131-8e19-c1d4a3bdfb8d
Wearden, Alison
57425d54-35b4-450e-8deb-ab18cd7016dc
Barrowclough, Christine
bc8a2cfa-c710-4f40-8603-3e1e674adb0c

Band, Rebecca, Wearden, Alison and Barrowclough, Christine (2015) Patient outcomes in association with significant other responses to chronic fatigue syndrome: a systematic review of the literature. Clinical Psychology Science and Practice, 22 (1), 29-46. (doi:10.1111/cpsp.12093).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Social processes have been suggested as important in the maintenance of chronic fatigue syndrome (also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis; CFS/ME), but the specific role of close interpersonal relationships remains unclear. We reviewed 14 articles investigating significant other responses to close others with CFS/ME and the relationships between these responses and patient outcomes. Significant other beliefs attributing patient responsibility for the onset and ongoing symptoms of CFS/ME were associated with increased patient distress. Increased symptom severity, disability, and distress were also associated with both solicitous and negative significant other responses. Specific aspects of dyadic relationship quality, including high Expressed Emotion, were identified as important. We propose extending current theoretical models of CFS/ME to include two potential perpetuating interpersonal processes; the evidence reviewed suggests that the development of significant other–focused interventions may also be beneficial.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 14 March 2015
Published date: March 2015
Keywords: behaviors, beliefs, chronic fatigue syndrome, significant others
Organisations: Psychology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 375197
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/375197
ISSN: 0969-5893
PURE UUID: c6b2e269-0a73-49c1-8673-326f476b0c53
ORCID for Rebecca Band: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5403-1708

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Mar 2015 13:55
Last modified: 01 Oct 2019 00:35

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