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ICAN: high peak and high average power ultrafast lasers via coherent amplification networks

ICAN: high peak and high average power ultrafast lasers via coherent amplification networks
ICAN: high peak and high average power ultrafast lasers via coherent amplification networks
Progress in laser wake field acceleration has been rapid in recent years, arousing interest in laser-based accelerators as a practical technology. Laser sources for wake field acceleration remain at present only able to operate at repetition rates of 1Hz or less. The International Coherent Amplification Network (ICAN) project, a collaboration between Ecole Polytechnique Paris, France, University of Southampton UK, Fraunhofer IOF Jena, Germany, and CERN, aims to leverage the ability of optical fibre-based lasers to deliver very high average powers in order to increase the repetition rates to tens or hundreds of kHz. The main obstacle is the ability of the optical fibres to produce the very high peak powers necessary. ICAN draws on the technology for fibre networks to amplify and split a seed pulse into many replicas, which can each be amplified to relatively high energy. These replicas can be coherently recombined to produce pulses with the very high energy and very high repetition rate required for practical applications. Progress toward ICAN lasers will be reported, along with potential architectures and issues.
Brocklesby, W.S.
c53ca2f6-db65-4e19-ad00-eebeb2e6de67
Brocklesby, W.S.
c53ca2f6-db65-4e19-ad00-eebeb2e6de67

Brocklesby, W.S. (2014) ICAN: high peak and high average power ultrafast lasers via coherent amplification networks. Ultrahigh Intensity Lasers, India. 12 - 17 Oct 2014.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Progress in laser wake field acceleration has been rapid in recent years, arousing interest in laser-based accelerators as a practical technology. Laser sources for wake field acceleration remain at present only able to operate at repetition rates of 1Hz or less. The International Coherent Amplification Network (ICAN) project, a collaboration between Ecole Polytechnique Paris, France, University of Southampton UK, Fraunhofer IOF Jena, Germany, and CERN, aims to leverage the ability of optical fibre-based lasers to deliver very high average powers in order to increase the repetition rates to tens or hundreds of kHz. The main obstacle is the ability of the optical fibres to produce the very high peak powers necessary. ICAN draws on the technology for fibre networks to amplify and split a seed pulse into many replicas, which can each be amplified to relatively high energy. These replicas can be coherently recombined to produce pulses with the very high energy and very high repetition rate required for practical applications. Progress toward ICAN lasers will be reported, along with potential architectures and issues.

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More information

Published date: October 2014
Venue - Dates: Ultrahigh Intensity Lasers, India, 2014-10-12 - 2014-10-17
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 375397
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/375397
PURE UUID: 82f42912-959f-4213-b709-19d9d433362a
ORCID for W.S. Brocklesby: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2123-6712

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Mar 2015 13:41
Last modified: 30 Nov 2018 01:37

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