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Fall frequency, predicting falls and participating in falls research: similarities among people with Parkinson's disease with and without cognitive impairment

Fall frequency, predicting falls and participating in falls research: similarities among people with Parkinson's disease with and without cognitive impairment
Fall frequency, predicting falls and participating in falls research: similarities among people with Parkinson's disease with and without cognitive impairment
Objective
We compared fall frequency and prediction among People with Parkinson's Disease (PwP) with and without cognitive impairment (CI); researchers sometimes overlook the former, concerned about consent, recall and adherence and differences in fall frequency and predictability.

Methods
We recruited 101 PwP from one clinic, used the Montreal Cognitive Assessment to measure CI, noted repeated falls recalled retrospectively over 12 months and evaluated ‘repeated falls’ and ‘difficulty turning’ as predictors of falls over three months.

Results
Participant median age was 76 years, and time since diagnosis 6 years. Of 40 participants without CI, 40% recalled falls and 55% fell during follow-up (1.9 (±3.8) falls/person), the sensitivity of fall history being 57% and of turning 36%. Of 36 participants with mild CI, 42% recalled falls and 42% fell during follow-up (1.2 (±1.8) falls/person), the sensitivity of fall history being 67% and of turning 69%. Of 25 participants with moderate CI, 60% recalled falls and 58% fell during follow-up (1.2 (±1.8) falls/person), the sensitivity of fall history being 71% and of turning 69%.

Conclusions
Researchers need not exclude people with CI assuming falls are more frequent and less predictable than among those without. Fall rates (falls/person during follow-up) were similar among people with and without CI. Falls and difficulty turning were more sensitive predictors of falling in those with CI than those without: a simple mobility test may suggest an individual's risk of falling if a history is unavailable. Most PwP with moderate CI fall repeatedly: carer involvement facilitates their inclusion in research.
falls, research participation, parkinson's, cognitive impairment
1353-8020
55-60
Amar, K.
9b704f6d-9c4b-4502-8769-6fe134b5b9fb
Stack, E.
7adccc27-4910-41bb-adc4-409e00a89601
Fitton, Carolyn
6288734e-9b6e-470d-b420-33c16d65b879
Ashburn, Anne
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991
Roberts, H.C.
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253
Amar, K.
9b704f6d-9c4b-4502-8769-6fe134b5b9fb
Stack, E.
7adccc27-4910-41bb-adc4-409e00a89601
Fitton, Carolyn
6288734e-9b6e-470d-b420-33c16d65b879
Ashburn, Anne
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991
Roberts, H.C.
5ea688b1-ef7a-4173-9da0-26290e18f253

Amar, K., Stack, E., Fitton, Carolyn, Ashburn, Anne and Roberts, H.C. (2015) Fall frequency, predicting falls and participating in falls research: similarities among people with Parkinson's disease with and without cognitive impairment. Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, 21 (1), 55-60. (doi:10.1016/j.parkreldis.2014.11.001). (PMID:25466401)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective
We compared fall frequency and prediction among People with Parkinson's Disease (PwP) with and without cognitive impairment (CI); researchers sometimes overlook the former, concerned about consent, recall and adherence and differences in fall frequency and predictability.

Methods
We recruited 101 PwP from one clinic, used the Montreal Cognitive Assessment to measure CI, noted repeated falls recalled retrospectively over 12 months and evaluated ‘repeated falls’ and ‘difficulty turning’ as predictors of falls over three months.

Results
Participant median age was 76 years, and time since diagnosis 6 years. Of 40 participants without CI, 40% recalled falls and 55% fell during follow-up (1.9 (±3.8) falls/person), the sensitivity of fall history being 57% and of turning 36%. Of 36 participants with mild CI, 42% recalled falls and 42% fell during follow-up (1.2 (±1.8) falls/person), the sensitivity of fall history being 67% and of turning 69%. Of 25 participants with moderate CI, 60% recalled falls and 58% fell during follow-up (1.2 (±1.8) falls/person), the sensitivity of fall history being 71% and of turning 69%.

Conclusions
Researchers need not exclude people with CI assuming falls are more frequent and less predictable than among those without. Fall rates (falls/person during follow-up) were similar among people with and without CI. Falls and difficulty turning were more sensitive predictors of falling in those with CI than those without: a simple mobility test may suggest an individual's risk of falling if a history is unavailable. Most PwP with moderate CI fall repeatedly: carer involvement facilitates their inclusion in research.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 November 2014
e-pub ahead of print date: 12 November 2014
Published date: January 2015
Keywords: falls, research participation, parkinson's, cognitive impairment
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 375430
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/375430
ISSN: 1353-8020
PURE UUID: acd26ee9-8c5f-4652-be54-c8c68ac72dd1
ORCID for H.C. Roberts: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5291-1880

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Mar 2015 14:19
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:02

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