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Neurofeedback for ADHD: a review of current evidence

Neurofeedback for ADHD: a review of current evidence
Neurofeedback for ADHD: a review of current evidence
Considerable scientific effort has been directed at developing effective treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Among alternative treatment approaches, neurofeedback has gained some promising empirical support in recent years from controlled studies as a treatment of core ADHD symptoms. However, a recent stringent meta-analysis of 8 randomized controlled trials published in 2013 found that the effects were stronger for unblinded measures and 3 recent subsequently published well-controlled trials found no effects for the most blinded ADHD outcome. Firmer conclusions must await upcoming evidence from larger controlled studies and future meta-analyses contrasting different forms of neurofeedback and different outcome measures.
adhd, treatment, neurofeedback, slow cortical potentials, frequency bands, reward
1056-4993
789-806
Holtmann, Martin
511fa11b-f2cb-413f-880e-50c3b04ad9d3
Sonuga-Barke, Edmund
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Brandeis, Daniel
58d13628-f513-4af5-822c-7401cf5dbfd4
Holtmann, Martin
511fa11b-f2cb-413f-880e-50c3b04ad9d3
Sonuga-Barke, Edmund
bc80bf95-6cf9-4c76-a09d-eaaf0b717635
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Brandeis, Daniel
58d13628-f513-4af5-822c-7401cf5dbfd4

Holtmann, Martin, Sonuga-Barke, Edmund, Cortese, Samuele and Brandeis, Daniel (2014) Neurofeedback for ADHD: a review of current evidence. [in special issue: ADHD: Non-Parmacologic Interventions] Child Adolescent Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 23 (4), 789-806. (doi:10.1016/j.chc.2014.05.006). (PMID:25220087)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Considerable scientific effort has been directed at developing effective treatments for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Among alternative treatment approaches, neurofeedback has gained some promising empirical support in recent years from controlled studies as a treatment of core ADHD symptoms. However, a recent stringent meta-analysis of 8 randomized controlled trials published in 2013 found that the effects were stronger for unblinded measures and 3 recent subsequently published well-controlled trials found no effects for the most blinded ADHD outcome. Firmer conclusions must await upcoming evidence from larger controlled studies and future meta-analyses contrasting different forms of neurofeedback and different outcome measures.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 10 August 2014
Published date: 2014
Keywords: adhd, treatment, neurofeedback, slow cortical potentials, frequency bands, reward
Organisations: Clinical Neuroscience

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 375559
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/375559
ISSN: 1056-4993
PURE UUID: 6a0ab3ee-6909-44c6-a87e-748a78610fab
ORCID for Samuele Cortese: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5877-8075

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Mar 2015 13:10
Last modified: 29 Aug 2019 00:32

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Contributors

Author: Martin Holtmann
Author: Edmund Sonuga-Barke
Author: Samuele Cortese ORCID iD
Author: Daniel Brandeis

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