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Higher oily fish consumption in late pregnancy is associated with reduced aortic stiffness in the child at age 9 years

Higher oily fish consumption in late pregnancy is associated with reduced aortic stiffness in the child at age 9 years
Higher oily fish consumption in late pregnancy is associated with reduced aortic stiffness in the child at age 9 years
RATIONALE: Higher pulse wave velocity (PWV) reflects increased arterial stiffness and is an established cardiovascular risk marker associated with lower long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake in adults. Experimentally, maternal fatty acid intake in pregnancy has lasting effects on offspring arterial stiffness.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between maternal consumption of oily fish, a source of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, in pregnancy and child's aortic stiffness age 9 years.

METHODS AND RESULTS: In a mother-offspring study (Southampton Women's Survey), the child's descending aorta PWV was measured at the age of 9 years using velocity-encoded phase-contrast MRI and related to maternal oily fish consumption assessed prospectively during pregnancy. Higher oily fish consumption in late pregnancy was associated with lower childhood aortic PWV (sex-adjusted ?=-0.084 m/s per portion per week; 95% confidence interval, -0.137 to -0.031; P=0.002; n=226). Mother's educational attainment was independently associated with child's PWV. PWV was not associated with the child's current oily fish consumption.

CONCLUSIONS: Level of maternal oily fish consumption in pregnancy may influence child's large artery development, with potential long-term consequences for later cardiovascular risk.
fatty acids, pregnancy, vascular stiffness
0009-7330
1202-1205
Bryant, J.A.
83de7921-a32f-464b-923c-13c16dca2458
Hanson, Mark A.
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f
Peebles, C.
8eb51995-0f07-46f7-9ca2-f97301fefc3d
Davies, L.
62b6dfd3-69cd-4f3d-9527-a5c70c7c74a8
Inskip, H.M.
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Robinson, S.M.
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Godfrey, K.M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Bryant, J.A.
83de7921-a32f-464b-923c-13c16dca2458
Hanson, Mark A.
1952fad1-abc7-4284-a0bc-a7eb31f70a3f
Peebles, C.
8eb51995-0f07-46f7-9ca2-f97301fefc3d
Davies, L.
62b6dfd3-69cd-4f3d-9527-a5c70c7c74a8
Inskip, H.M.
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Robinson, S.M.
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Cooper, C.
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Godfrey, K.M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd

Bryant, J.A., Hanson, Mark A., Peebles, C., Davies, L., Inskip, H.M., Robinson, S.M., Calder, Philip C., Cooper, C. and Godfrey, K.M. (2015) Higher oily fish consumption in late pregnancy is associated with reduced aortic stiffness in the child at age 9 years. Circulation Research, 116 (7), 1202-1205. (PMID:25700036)

Record type: Article

Abstract

RATIONALE: Higher pulse wave velocity (PWV) reflects increased arterial stiffness and is an established cardiovascular risk marker associated with lower long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake in adults. Experimentally, maternal fatty acid intake in pregnancy has lasting effects on offspring arterial stiffness.

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between maternal consumption of oily fish, a source of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, in pregnancy and child's aortic stiffness age 9 years.

METHODS AND RESULTS: In a mother-offspring study (Southampton Women's Survey), the child's descending aorta PWV was measured at the age of 9 years using velocity-encoded phase-contrast MRI and related to maternal oily fish consumption assessed prospectively during pregnancy. Higher oily fish consumption in late pregnancy was associated with lower childhood aortic PWV (sex-adjusted ?=-0.084 m/s per portion per week; 95% confidence interval, -0.137 to -0.031; P=0.002; n=226). Mother's educational attainment was independently associated with child's PWV. PWV was not associated with the child's current oily fish consumption.

CONCLUSIONS: Level of maternal oily fish consumption in pregnancy may influence child's large artery development, with potential long-term consequences for later cardiovascular risk.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 February 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 February 2015
Keywords: fatty acids, pregnancy, vascular stiffness
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 375581
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/375581
ISSN: 0009-7330
PURE UUID: e1968db0-09fc-427a-bf1a-fb8ddf9135f0
ORCID for Mark A. Hanson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6907-613X
ORCID for H.M. Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for S.M. Robinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1766-7269
ORCID for C. Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for K.M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

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Date deposited: 31 Mar 2015 13:25
Last modified: 27 Jul 2018 00:34

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Contributors

Author: J.A. Bryant
Author: Mark A. Hanson ORCID iD
Author: C. Peebles
Author: L. Davies
Author: H.M. Inskip ORCID iD
Author: S.M. Robinson ORCID iD
Author: C. Cooper ORCID iD
Author: K.M. Godfrey ORCID iD

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