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Player, student, designer: games design students and changing relationships with games

Player, student, designer: games design students and changing relationships with games
Player, student, designer: games design students and changing relationships with games
Drawing on empirical research conducted with U.K. games design students, games design course tutors, and professional designers alongside broader careers advice and guidance from industry representatives, this article will explore the changing relationships games design students describe with digital games and games technologies. Opening with accounts of their childhood pastimes and passions, the discussion will move to consider closely students? development within a higher education context and the associated, emerging shifts in their engagements with games technologies. Through exploring the transition from hobby to career and the overlapping player/student/designer positions, questions concerning human and technological interactions, identity, and wider career and skills contexts are highlighted. In drawing out such questions and issues, this article will seek to outline how exploring the practices and understandings of students prompts reflection on both located and specific and more broadly applicable engagements between digital games technologies, industry, and individuals.
games design, higher education, identity, gameplay, modding
1555-4120
256-277
Ashton, Daniel
b267eae4-7bdb-4fe3-9267-5ebad36e86f7
Ashton, Daniel
b267eae4-7bdb-4fe3-9267-5ebad36e86f7

Ashton, Daniel (2010) Player, student, designer: games design students and changing relationships with games. Games and Culture, 5 (3), 256-277. (doi:10.1177/1555412009359766).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Drawing on empirical research conducted with U.K. games design students, games design course tutors, and professional designers alongside broader careers advice and guidance from industry representatives, this article will explore the changing relationships games design students describe with digital games and games technologies. Opening with accounts of their childhood pastimes and passions, the discussion will move to consider closely students? development within a higher education context and the associated, emerging shifts in their engagements with games technologies. Through exploring the transition from hobby to career and the overlapping player/student/designer positions, questions concerning human and technological interactions, identity, and wider career and skills contexts are highlighted. In drawing out such questions and issues, this article will seek to outline how exploring the practices and understandings of students prompts reflection on both located and specific and more broadly applicable engagements between digital games technologies, industry, and individuals.

Text
Ashton (2010) 'Player, Student, Designer', Games and Culture.doc - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Published date: July 2010
Keywords: games design, higher education, identity, gameplay, modding
Organisations: Winchester School of Art

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 375658
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/375658
ISSN: 1555-4120
PURE UUID: ab1996bb-ecae-4e26-924c-9b3bef378a15
ORCID for Daniel Ashton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3120-1783

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 23 Jun 2015 09:40
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 01:33

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Author: Daniel Ashton ORCID iD

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