The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

A non-local source of Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age gold

A non-local source of Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age gold
A non-local source of Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age gold
Lead isotope analyses of 50 Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age gold artefacts favour a gold source in southern Ireland. However when combined with major element analysis, the artefacts are not consistent with any Irish gold deposit analysed to date. Understanding the lead isotope signatures of ore deposits within a study region allows informed inferences to be drawn regarding the likelihood that an unanalysed ore deposit was exploited in the past. If an Irish gold source is assumed, then the gold is most likely to have originated from deposits hosted by Old Red Sandstone in the Variscan ore field of south-west Ireland. However, based on our current understanding of mineralisation in the region, this scenario is considered unlikely. A non-Irish source for the gold is therefore preferred – a scenario that may favour cosmologically-driven acquisition, ie, the deliberate procurement of a material from distant or esoteric sources. Available geochemical data, combined with current archaeological evidence, favour the alluvial deposits of south-west Britain as the most likely source of the gold
0079-497X
149-177
Standish, C.D.
0b996271-da5d-4c4f-9e05-a2ec90e8561d
Dhuime, B.
2393b509-0f0c-4243-ac40-c57739491a9c
Hawkesworth, C.J.
7d7cd637-b17f-4bf9-b207-88d8e4d2d21d
Pike, A.W.G.
e8603e20-0a89-4d57-a294-247b983fc857
Standish, C.D.
0b996271-da5d-4c4f-9e05-a2ec90e8561d
Dhuime, B.
2393b509-0f0c-4243-ac40-c57739491a9c
Hawkesworth, C.J.
7d7cd637-b17f-4bf9-b207-88d8e4d2d21d
Pike, A.W.G.
e8603e20-0a89-4d57-a294-247b983fc857

Standish, C.D., Dhuime, B., Hawkesworth, C.J. and Pike, A.W.G. (2015) A non-local source of Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age gold. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society, 81, 149-177. (doi:10.1017/ppr.2015.4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Lead isotope analyses of 50 Irish Chalcolithic and Early Bronze Age gold artefacts favour a gold source in southern Ireland. However when combined with major element analysis, the artefacts are not consistent with any Irish gold deposit analysed to date. Understanding the lead isotope signatures of ore deposits within a study region allows informed inferences to be drawn regarding the likelihood that an unanalysed ore deposit was exploited in the past. If an Irish gold source is assumed, then the gold is most likely to have originated from deposits hosted by Old Red Sandstone in the Variscan ore field of south-west Ireland. However, based on our current understanding of mineralisation in the region, this scenario is considered unlikely. A non-Irish source for the gold is therefore preferred – a scenario that may favour cosmologically-driven acquisition, ie, the deliberate procurement of a material from distant or esoteric sources. Available geochemical data, combined with current archaeological evidence, favour the alluvial deposits of south-west Britain as the most likely source of the gold

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 April 2015
Published date: 8 April 2015
Organisations: Archaeology

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 375852
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/375852
ISSN: 0079-497X
PURE UUID: a38ef5b0-bbca-4b80-902a-e68eba74a395
ORCID for A.W.G. Pike: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5610-8948

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Apr 2015 11:02
Last modified: 10 Sep 2019 00:36

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×