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Alcoholic liver disease - the extent of the problem and what you can do about it

Alcoholic liver disease - the extent of the problem and what you can do about it
Alcoholic liver disease - the extent of the problem and what you can do about it
It takes upwards of ten years for alcohol-related liver disease to progress from fatty liver through fibrosis to cirrhosis to acute on chronic liver failure. This process is silent and symptom free and can easily be missed in primary care, usually presenting with advanced cirrhosis. At this late stage, management consists of expert supportive care, with prompt identification and treatment of bleeding, sepsis and renal problems, as well as support to change behaviour and stop harmful alcohol consumption. There are opportunities to improve care by bringing liver care everywhere up to the standards of the best liver units, as detailed in the Lancet Commission report. We also need a fundamental rethink of the technologies and approaches used in primary care to detect and intervene in liver disease at a much earlier stage. However, the most effective and cost-effective measure would be a proper evidence-based alcohol strategy
1470-2118
179-185
Hazeldine, Simon
797685d7-3460-44a3-9162-c78d5f0a64b2
Hydes, Theresa J.
c7744323-57ce-48fd-be8d-e299554297d9
Sheron, Nick
cbf852e3-cfaa-43b2-ab99-a954d96069f1
Hazeldine, Simon
797685d7-3460-44a3-9162-c78d5f0a64b2
Hydes, Theresa J.
c7744323-57ce-48fd-be8d-e299554297d9
Sheron, Nick
cbf852e3-cfaa-43b2-ab99-a954d96069f1

Hazeldine, Simon, Hydes, Theresa J. and Sheron, Nick (2015) Alcoholic liver disease - the extent of the problem and what you can do about it. Clinical Medicine, 15 (2), 179-185. (doi:10.7861/clinmedicine.15-2-179).

Record type: Article

Abstract

It takes upwards of ten years for alcohol-related liver disease to progress from fatty liver through fibrosis to cirrhosis to acute on chronic liver failure. This process is silent and symptom free and can easily be missed in primary care, usually presenting with advanced cirrhosis. At this late stage, management consists of expert supportive care, with prompt identification and treatment of bleeding, sepsis and renal problems, as well as support to change behaviour and stop harmful alcohol consumption. There are opportunities to improve care by bringing liver care everywhere up to the standards of the best liver units, as detailed in the Lancet Commission report. We also need a fundamental rethink of the technologies and approaches used in primary care to detect and intervene in liver disease at a much earlier stage. However, the most effective and cost-effective measure would be a proper evidence-based alcohol strategy

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Published date: April 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

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Local EPrints ID: 375889
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/375889
ISSN: 1470-2118
PURE UUID: 893cc542-d3d7-4ce2-9998-1f0f33bc3f84
ORCID for Nick Sheron: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5232-8292

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Date deposited: 17 Apr 2015 12:57
Last modified: 16 Sep 2019 18:28

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Contributors

Author: Simon Hazeldine
Author: Theresa J. Hydes
Author: Nick Sheron ORCID iD

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