The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Manufacturing of high performance hollow core microstructured optical fibres

Manufacturing of high performance hollow core microstructured optical fibres
Manufacturing of high performance hollow core microstructured optical fibres
Although fabrication technologies of Microstructured Optical Fibres (MOFs) fibres have matured at an impressive rate over the past ten years, these fibres are widely perceived as "challenging" and some key issues are still outstanding in order to improve their manufacturability. One such issue revolves around methods to improve structural control during the fibre draw. Structural control is of particular importance for certain types of microstructured fibres, such as hollow core Photonic Bandgap Fibres (PBGFs) and Anti-resonant (AR) fibres (also known as Kagome fibres). These fibres exploit resonant and/or anti-resonant guidance mechanisms and thus their transmission properties depend on the structure to a much greater extent as compared to conventional fibres. Hollow core MOFs have been identified as promising media for applications such as low latency (speed-of-light-in-air) communications, fibre sensing (chemical sensing, gyroscopes, sensors based on distributed scattering), laser power delivery (both high-peak and high average). However the successful implementation of these fibres in advanced demonstrators leading to commercial devices has been hindered by high cost, poor consistency and, in some instances, by lack of fibres with sufficiently good properties. We are actively investigating methods to improve structural control during the fibre draw and methods for scaling up the current manufacturing yields. Here we present recent progress in the fabrication hollow core MOFs at the Optoelectronics Research Centre; in particular, we report the fabrication of ultra-low loss (~few dB/km), wide bandwidth (>150nm) Photonic Bandgap Fibres and anti-resonant Hexagram Fibres with broadband low loss transmission suitable for the delivery of extremely high peak optical powers.
Petrovich, M.N.
bfe895a0-da85-4a40-870a-2c7bfc84a4cf
Baddela, N.K.
1a871ff8-f95d-495b-8b91-9d6ccd209528
Hayes, J.R.
a6d3acd6-d7d5-4614-970e-0e8c594e48e2
Poletti, F.
9adcef99-5558-4644-96d7-ce24b5897491
Wheeler, N.V.
0fd34178-a77b-4c71-a3a6-86a1f634f1a0
Richardson, D.J.
ebfe1ff9-d0c2-4e52-b7ae-c1b13bccdef3
Petrovich, M.N.
bfe895a0-da85-4a40-870a-2c7bfc84a4cf
Baddela, N.K.
1a871ff8-f95d-495b-8b91-9d6ccd209528
Hayes, J.R.
a6d3acd6-d7d5-4614-970e-0e8c594e48e2
Poletti, F.
9adcef99-5558-4644-96d7-ce24b5897491
Wheeler, N.V.
0fd34178-a77b-4c71-a3a6-86a1f634f1a0
Richardson, D.J.
ebfe1ff9-d0c2-4e52-b7ae-c1b13bccdef3

Petrovich, M.N., Baddela, N.K., Hayes, J.R., Poletti, F., Wheeler, N.V. and Richardson, D.J. (2012) Manufacturing of high performance hollow core microstructured optical fibres. 1st EPSRC Manufacturing the Future Conference, Loughborough, United Kingdom. 19 - 20 Sep 2012. 1 pp .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Although fabrication technologies of Microstructured Optical Fibres (MOFs) fibres have matured at an impressive rate over the past ten years, these fibres are widely perceived as "challenging" and some key issues are still outstanding in order to improve their manufacturability. One such issue revolves around methods to improve structural control during the fibre draw. Structural control is of particular importance for certain types of microstructured fibres, such as hollow core Photonic Bandgap Fibres (PBGFs) and Anti-resonant (AR) fibres (also known as Kagome fibres). These fibres exploit resonant and/or anti-resonant guidance mechanisms and thus their transmission properties depend on the structure to a much greater extent as compared to conventional fibres. Hollow core MOFs have been identified as promising media for applications such as low latency (speed-of-light-in-air) communications, fibre sensing (chemical sensing, gyroscopes, sensors based on distributed scattering), laser power delivery (both high-peak and high average). However the successful implementation of these fibres in advanced demonstrators leading to commercial devices has been hindered by high cost, poor consistency and, in some instances, by lack of fibres with sufficiently good properties. We are actively investigating methods to improve structural control during the fibre draw and methods for scaling up the current manufacturing yields. Here we present recent progress in the fabrication hollow core MOFs at the Optoelectronics Research Centre; in particular, we report the fabrication of ultra-low loss (~few dB/km), wide bandwidth (>150nm) Photonic Bandgap Fibres and anti-resonant Hexagram Fibres with broadband low loss transmission suitable for the delivery of extremely high peak optical powers.

Text
5642.pdf - Other
Download (104kB)

More information

Published date: September 2012
Venue - Dates: 1st EPSRC Manufacturing the Future Conference, Loughborough, United Kingdom, 2012-09-19 - 2012-09-20
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 376005
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/376005
PURE UUID: 224d51d6-9e29-49d5-96a7-be9b1d1d95b9
ORCID for M.N. Petrovich: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3905-5901
ORCID for F. Poletti: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1000-3083
ORCID for N.V. Wheeler: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1265-9510
ORCID for D.J. Richardson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7751-1058

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Apr 2015 14:14
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:56

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×