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Fabrication of chalcogenide and emerging materials by novel CVD technology

Fabrication of chalcogenide and emerging materials by novel CVD technology
Fabrication of chalcogenide and emerging materials by novel CVD technology
Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technology is a widely used method in the optoelectronics and semiconductor industries, producing high purity thin films, in crystalline, amorphous and epitaxial phases. A variety of materials can be produced in this way although for the most part use of the technique has focussed on poly-silicon, silicon dioxide, silicon nitride and metallic materials. The advantages of CVD processing, which offers offer superior quality compared to conventional methods such as sputtering or co-evaporation, include conformality, coverage, and stoichiometry control. The process should also be more economical and scalable to large substrates as it can take place at atmospheric pressure rather than under vacuum conditions.

The ORC has a long history of exploiting CVD for optoelectronic applications, initially depositing high purity silica for the achievement of some the worlds’ lowest loss optical fibres. Since 2001, we have been extending our CVD technology to the chalcogenides and are now routinely depositing germanium and antimony based sulphides on a variety of substrates including glass, silicon and flexible metallic and polyimide materials for optical applications and now we are in the process to fabricate these chalcogenide glasses in the fibre preform.

In addition, our CVD technology has also been applied to fabricate chalcogenide materials for phase change memory applications, grapheme and molybdenum disulphide thin films for nano-electronic applications, and transparent conductive oxides, copper indium gallium sulphide, and copper zinc tin sulphide thin films for photovoltaic applications.
Huang, C.C.
825f7447-6d02-48f6-b95a-fa33da71f106
Al-Saab, F.
13f8eca8-04a1-4528-92d7-c5dd053e496c
Gholipour, B.
c17bd62d-9df6-40e6-bc42-65272d97e559
Ou, Jun-Yu
3fb703e3-b222-46d2-b4ee-75f296d9d64d
Hewak, D.W.
87c80070-c101-4f7a-914f-4cc3131e3db0
Huang, C.C.
825f7447-6d02-48f6-b95a-fa33da71f106
Al-Saab, F.
13f8eca8-04a1-4528-92d7-c5dd053e496c
Gholipour, B.
c17bd62d-9df6-40e6-bc42-65272d97e559
Ou, Jun-Yu
3fb703e3-b222-46d2-b4ee-75f296d9d64d
Hewak, D.W.
87c80070-c101-4f7a-914f-4cc3131e3db0

Huang, C.C., Al-Saab, F., Gholipour, B., Ou, Jun-Yu and Hewak, D.W. (2012) Fabrication of chalcogenide and emerging materials by novel CVD technology. Manufacturing The Future Conference (MTFC) 2012, United Kingdom. 19 - 20 Sep 2012.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technology is a widely used method in the optoelectronics and semiconductor industries, producing high purity thin films, in crystalline, amorphous and epitaxial phases. A variety of materials can be produced in this way although for the most part use of the technique has focussed on poly-silicon, silicon dioxide, silicon nitride and metallic materials. The advantages of CVD processing, which offers offer superior quality compared to conventional methods such as sputtering or co-evaporation, include conformality, coverage, and stoichiometry control. The process should also be more economical and scalable to large substrates as it can take place at atmospheric pressure rather than under vacuum conditions.

The ORC has a long history of exploiting CVD for optoelectronic applications, initially depositing high purity silica for the achievement of some the worlds’ lowest loss optical fibres. Since 2001, we have been extending our CVD technology to the chalcogenides and are now routinely depositing germanium and antimony based sulphides on a variety of substrates including glass, silicon and flexible metallic and polyimide materials for optical applications and now we are in the process to fabricate these chalcogenide glasses in the fibre preform.

In addition, our CVD technology has also been applied to fabricate chalcogenide materials for phase change memory applications, grapheme and molybdenum disulphide thin films for nano-electronic applications, and transparent conductive oxides, copper indium gallium sulphide, and copper zinc tin sulphide thin films for photovoltaic applications.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: September 2012
Venue - Dates: Manufacturing The Future Conference (MTFC) 2012, United Kingdom, 2012-09-19 - 2012-09-20
Organisations: Optoelectronics Research Centre

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 376019
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/376019
PURE UUID: 6007fc40-77e0-4824-be28-678e95776de1
ORCID for C.C. Huang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3471-2463
ORCID for Jun-Yu Ou: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8028-6130
ORCID for D.W. Hewak: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2093-5773

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Apr 2015 14:21
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:17

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