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A randomised controlled trial of positive memory training for the treatment of depression within schizophrenia

A randomised controlled trial of positive memory training for the treatment of depression within schizophrenia
A randomised controlled trial of positive memory training for the treatment of depression within schizophrenia
Background

Depression is highly prevalent within individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, and is associated with an increased risk of suicide. There are no current evidence based treatments for low mood within this group. The specific targeting of co-morbid conditions within complex mental health problems lends itself to the development of short-term structured interventions which are relatively easy to disseminate within health services. A brief cognitive intervention based on a competitive memory theory of depression, is being evaluated in terms of its effectiveness in reducing depression within this group.

Methods/Design

This is a single blind, intention-to-treat, multi-site, randomized controlled trial comparing Positive Memory Training plus Treatment as Usual with Treatment as Usual alone. Participants will be recruited from two NHS Trusts in Southern England. In order to be eligible, participants must have a DSM-V diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder and exhibit at least a mild level of depression. Following baseline assessment eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either the Positive Memory Training plus Treatment as Usual group or the Treatment as Usual group. Outcome will be assessed at the end of treatment (3-months) and at 6-month and 9-month post randomization by assessors blind to group allocation. The primary outcome will be levels of depression and secondary outcomes will be severity of psychotic symptoms and cost-effectiveness. Semi-structured interviews will be conducted with all participants who are allocated to the treatment group so as to explore the acceptability of the intervention.

Discussion

Cognitive behaviour therapy is recommended for individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. However, the number of sessions and length of training required to deliver this intervention has caused a limit in availability. The current trial will evaluate a short-term structured protocol which targets a co-morbid condition often considered of primary importance by service users. If successful the intervention will be an important addition to current initiatives aimed at increasing access to psychological therapies for people diagnosed with severe mental health problems.

Trial registration

Current Controlled Trials. ISRCTN99485756. Registered 13 March 2014.
0893-133X
1-12
Steel, Craig
170e312a-f535-4a80-8b2c-6e0c62c9e912
van der Gaag, Mark
9f2299e5-ea1d-496c-812d-155a669d5120
Korrelboom, Kees
1ad86580-7455-4bb6-a453-5c16d57a8f46
Simon, Judit
a7b9d815-c24c-4089-8b7e-fac287eeb9e6
Phiri, Peter
bdcad679-98c5-47c5-a7ad-15865f1e880e
Baksh, Fazil M.
06fe0393-058a-481e-800c-0d8f2e1b680e
Wykes, Til
0c2f31ee-b66c-47a8-af3a-acf7992c2ad1
Rose, Diane
15f15e95-f35b-40a0-a467-433d3b6f9657
Hardcastle, Mark
2e5b641b-60a4-400e-bb47-18e88c97e29e
Enright, Simon
ae29ec0a-5a64-44a7-98c6-156ab71115bf
Evans, Gareth
ee001bc1-9b29-4a58-a251-a27b18eff669
Kingdon, David G.
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b
Steel, Craig
170e312a-f535-4a80-8b2c-6e0c62c9e912
van der Gaag, Mark
9f2299e5-ea1d-496c-812d-155a669d5120
Korrelboom, Kees
1ad86580-7455-4bb6-a453-5c16d57a8f46
Simon, Judit
a7b9d815-c24c-4089-8b7e-fac287eeb9e6
Phiri, Peter
bdcad679-98c5-47c5-a7ad-15865f1e880e
Baksh, Fazil M.
06fe0393-058a-481e-800c-0d8f2e1b680e
Wykes, Til
0c2f31ee-b66c-47a8-af3a-acf7992c2ad1
Rose, Diane
15f15e95-f35b-40a0-a467-433d3b6f9657
Hardcastle, Mark
2e5b641b-60a4-400e-bb47-18e88c97e29e
Enright, Simon
ae29ec0a-5a64-44a7-98c6-156ab71115bf
Evans, Gareth
ee001bc1-9b29-4a58-a251-a27b18eff669
Kingdon, David G.
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b

Steel, Craig, van der Gaag, Mark, Korrelboom, Kees, Simon, Judit, Phiri, Peter, Baksh, Fazil M., Wykes, Til, Rose, Diane, Hardcastle, Mark, Enright, Simon, Evans, Gareth and Kingdon, David G. (2015) A randomised controlled trial of positive memory training for the treatment of depression within schizophrenia. BMC Psychiatry, 15 (85), 1-12. (doi:10.1186/s12888-015-0453-6).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background

Depression is highly prevalent within individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia, and is associated with an increased risk of suicide. There are no current evidence based treatments for low mood within this group. The specific targeting of co-morbid conditions within complex mental health problems lends itself to the development of short-term structured interventions which are relatively easy to disseminate within health services. A brief cognitive intervention based on a competitive memory theory of depression, is being evaluated in terms of its effectiveness in reducing depression within this group.

Methods/Design

This is a single blind, intention-to-treat, multi-site, randomized controlled trial comparing Positive Memory Training plus Treatment as Usual with Treatment as Usual alone. Participants will be recruited from two NHS Trusts in Southern England. In order to be eligible, participants must have a DSM-V diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder and exhibit at least a mild level of depression. Following baseline assessment eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either the Positive Memory Training plus Treatment as Usual group or the Treatment as Usual group. Outcome will be assessed at the end of treatment (3-months) and at 6-month and 9-month post randomization by assessors blind to group allocation. The primary outcome will be levels of depression and secondary outcomes will be severity of psychotic symptoms and cost-effectiveness. Semi-structured interviews will be conducted with all participants who are allocated to the treatment group so as to explore the acceptability of the intervention.

Discussion

Cognitive behaviour therapy is recommended for individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. However, the number of sessions and length of training required to deliver this intervention has caused a limit in availability. The current trial will evaluate a short-term structured protocol which targets a co-morbid condition often considered of primary importance by service users. If successful the intervention will be an important addition to current initiatives aimed at increasing access to psychological therapies for people diagnosed with severe mental health problems.

Trial registration

Current Controlled Trials. ISRCTN99485756. Registered 13 March 2014.

PDF
Steel et al positive memory training for treatment of depression in schizophrenia BMC 2015.15.85.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 March 2015
Published date: 14 April 2015
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 376058
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/376058
ISSN: 0893-133X
PURE UUID: 59e0ab03-ad0e-4654-b1d9-fe180e764ad8

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Apr 2015 11:39
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:12

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Contributors

Author: Craig Steel
Author: Mark van der Gaag
Author: Kees Korrelboom
Author: Judit Simon
Author: Peter Phiri
Author: Fazil M. Baksh
Author: Til Wykes
Author: Diane Rose
Author: Mark Hardcastle
Author: Simon Enright
Author: Gareth Evans

University divisions

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