The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Fairness, free-riding and rainforest protection

Fairness, free-riding and rainforest protection
Fairness, free-riding and rainforest protection
If dangerous climate change is to be avoided, it is vital that carbon sinks such as tropical rainforests are protected. But protecting them has costs. These include opportunity costs: the potential economic benefits which those who currently control rainforests have to give up when they are protected. But who should bear those costs? Should countries which happen to have rainforests within their territories sacrifice their own economic development, because of our broader global interests in protecting key carbon sinks? This paper develops an argument from the ‘principle of fairness,’ which seeks to establish that outsiders should pay states with rainforests so as to share the costs of protection. If they do not, they can be condemned for free-riding on forest states. The argument is, I suggest, compelling and also capable of enjoying support from adherents of a wide variety of positions on global justice.
0090-5917
1-33
Armstrong, Chris
2fbfa0a3-9183-4562-9370-0f6441df90d2
Armstrong, Chris
2fbfa0a3-9183-4562-9370-0f6441df90d2

Armstrong, Chris (2016) Fairness, free-riding and rainforest protection. Political Theory, 1-33. (doi:10.1177/0090591715594840).

Record type: Article

Abstract

If dangerous climate change is to be avoided, it is vital that carbon sinks such as tropical rainforests are protected. But protecting them has costs. These include opportunity costs: the potential economic benefits which those who currently control rainforests have to give up when they are protected. But who should bear those costs? Should countries which happen to have rainforests within their territories sacrifice their own economic development, because of our broader global interests in protecting key carbon sinks? This paper develops an argument from the ‘principle of fairness,’ which seeks to establish that outsiders should pay states with rainforests so as to share the costs of protection. If they do not, they can be condemned for free-riding on forest states. The argument is, I suggest, compelling and also capable of enjoying support from adherents of a wide variety of positions on global justice.

Text
Final - Fairness, Free-Riding and Rainforest Protection.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
Download (268kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: April 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 July 2015
Published date: 1 February 2016
Organisations: Politics & International Relations

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 376349
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/376349
ISSN: 0090-5917
PURE UUID: ce79edbf-4564-408c-a288-7895ade604b5
ORCID for Chris Armstrong: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7462-5316

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Apr 2015 09:57
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:43

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Chris Armstrong ORCID iD

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×