The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

The promise of cognitive behavior therapy for treatment of severe mental disorders: a review of recent developments

The promise of cognitive behavior therapy for treatment of severe mental disorders: a review of recent developments
The promise of cognitive behavior therapy for treatment of severe mental disorders: a review of recent developments
Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), as exemplified by the model of psychotherapy developed and refined over the past 40 years by A.T. Beck and colleagues, is one of the treatments of first choice for ambulatory depressive and anxiety disorders. Over the past several decades, there have been vigorous efforts to adapt CBT for treatment of more severe mental disorders, including schizophrenia and the more chronic and/or treatment refractory mood disorders. These efforts have primarily studied CBT as an adjunctive therapy, i.e., in combination with pharmacotherapy. Given the several limitations of state-of-the-art pharmacotherapies for these severe mental disorders, demonstration of clinically meaningful additive effects for CBT would have important implications for improving public health. This paper reviews the key developments in this important area of therapeutics, providing a summary of the current state of the art and suggesting directions for future research
2051-5545
244-250
Thase, M.E.
56fb602d-818f-4d45-9967-90433505c9f4
Kingdon, D.G.
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b
Turkington, D.
a1e362f5-4ff3-4d27-81cb-1c6ddbcbf5b9
Thase, M.E.
56fb602d-818f-4d45-9967-90433505c9f4
Kingdon, D.G.
14cdc422-10b4-4b2d-88ec-24fde5f4329b
Turkington, D.
a1e362f5-4ff3-4d27-81cb-1c6ddbcbf5b9

Thase, M.E., Kingdon, D.G. and Turkington, D. (2014) The promise of cognitive behavior therapy for treatment of severe mental disorders: a review of recent developments. World Psychiatry, 13, 244-250. (doi:10.1002/wps.20149). (PMID:25273290)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), as exemplified by the model of psychotherapy developed and refined over the past 40 years by A.T. Beck and colleagues, is one of the treatments of first choice for ambulatory depressive and anxiety disorders. Over the past several decades, there have been vigorous efforts to adapt CBT for treatment of more severe mental disorders, including schizophrenia and the more chronic and/or treatment refractory mood disorders. These efforts have primarily studied CBT as an adjunctive therapy, i.e., in combination with pharmacotherapy. Given the several limitations of state-of-the-art pharmacotherapies for these severe mental disorders, demonstration of clinically meaningful additive effects for CBT would have important implications for improving public health. This paper reviews the key developments in this important area of therapeutics, providing a summary of the current state of the art and suggesting directions for future research

PDF
Thase_et_al-2014-World_Psychiatry.pdf - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

More information

Published date: October 2014
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 376418
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/376418
ISSN: 2051-5545
PURE UUID: 2d99871d-f319-4395-94cd-a05cc84de219

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Apr 2015 12:35
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 21:09

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×