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Current methods for capsular typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae

Current methods for capsular typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae
Current methods for capsular typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae
Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major respiratory tract pathogen causing pneumococcal disease mainly in children aged less than five years and in the elderly. Ninety-eight different capsular types (serotypes) of pneumococci have been reported, but pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) include polysaccharide antigens against only 7, 10 or 13 serotypes. It is therefore important to track the emergence of serotypes due to the clonal expansion of non-vaccine serotypes. Increased numbers of carried and disease-causing pneumococci are now being analysed as part of the post-PCV implementation surveillance studies and hence rapid, accurate and cost-effective typing methods are important.

Here we describe serotyping methods published prior to 10th November 2014 for pneumococcal capsule typing. Sixteen methods were identified; six were based on serological tests using immunological properties of the capsular epitopes, eight were semi-automated molecular tests, and one describes the identification of capsular type directly from whole genome data, which also allows for further intra and inter-genome analyses. There was no single method that could be recommended for all pneumococcal capsular typing applications. Although the Quellung reaction is still considered to be the gold-standard, laboratories should take into account the number of pneumococcal isolates and the type of samples to be used for testing, the time frame for the results and the resources available in order to select the most appropriate method. Most likely, a combination of phenotypic and genotypic methods would be optimal to monitor and evaluate the impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines and to provide information for future vaccine formulations
0167-7012
1-9
Jauneikaite, E.
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Tocheva, Anna S.
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Jefferies, Johanna M.C.
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Gladstone, R.A.
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Faust, S.N.
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Christodoulides, Myron
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Hibberd, M.L.
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Clarke, S.C.
f7d7f7a2-4b1f-4b36-883a-0f967e73fb17
Jauneikaite, E.
9dce57db-3796-4082-b37c-d1d336832ceb
Tocheva, Anna S.
b7da2781-6124-4e4e-9ef1-a98c5a166927
Jefferies, Johanna M.C.
9468e292-0b41-412d-9470-944e257c7bcf
Gladstone, R.A.
c75d747c-0663-49e3-8d81-4e797eb79d0a
Faust, S.N.
f97df780-9f9b-418e-b349-7adf63e150c1
Christodoulides, Myron
eba99148-620c-452a-a334-c1a52ba94078
Hibberd, M.L.
698b433e-e56b-44c7-81a3-1d46b30df9ed
Clarke, S.C.
f7d7f7a2-4b1f-4b36-883a-0f967e73fb17

Jauneikaite, E., Tocheva, Anna S., Jefferies, Johanna M.C., Gladstone, R.A., Faust, S.N., Christodoulides, Myron, Hibberd, M.L. and Clarke, S.C. (2015) Current methods for capsular typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Journal of Microbiological Methods, 113, 1-9. (doi:10.1016/j.mimet.2015.03.006).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major respiratory tract pathogen causing pneumococcal disease mainly in children aged less than five years and in the elderly. Ninety-eight different capsular types (serotypes) of pneumococci have been reported, but pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) include polysaccharide antigens against only 7, 10 or 13 serotypes. It is therefore important to track the emergence of serotypes due to the clonal expansion of non-vaccine serotypes. Increased numbers of carried and disease-causing pneumococci are now being analysed as part of the post-PCV implementation surveillance studies and hence rapid, accurate and cost-effective typing methods are important.

Here we describe serotyping methods published prior to 10th November 2014 for pneumococcal capsule typing. Sixteen methods were identified; six were based on serological tests using immunological properties of the capsular epitopes, eight were semi-automated molecular tests, and one describes the identification of capsular type directly from whole genome data, which also allows for further intra and inter-genome analyses. There was no single method that could be recommended for all pneumococcal capsular typing applications. Although the Quellung reaction is still considered to be the gold-standard, laboratories should take into account the number of pneumococcal isolates and the type of samples to be used for testing, the time frame for the results and the resources available in order to select the most appropriate method. Most likely, a combination of phenotypic and genotypic methods would be optimal to monitor and evaluate the impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines and to provide information for future vaccine formulations

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 March 2015
Published date: 25 March 2015
Organisations: Faculty of Medicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 376570
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/376570
ISSN: 0167-7012
PURE UUID: 3f659366-7cce-4869-a066-6955dcc2bec5
ORCID for S.N. Faust: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3410-7642
ORCID for Myron Christodoulides: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9663-4731
ORCID for S.C. Clarke: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7009-1548

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Date deposited: 01 May 2015 11:22
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:08

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Contributors

Author: E. Jauneikaite
Author: Anna S. Tocheva
Author: Johanna M.C. Jefferies
Author: R.A. Gladstone
Author: S.N. Faust ORCID iD
Author: M.L. Hibberd
Author: S.C. Clarke ORCID iD

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