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Contagion on networks with self-organised community structure

Contagion on networks with self-organised community structure
Contagion on networks with self-organised community structure
Living systems are organised in space. This imposes constraints on both their structural form and, consequently, their dynamics. While artificial life research has demonstrated that embedding an adaptive system in space tends to have a significant impact on its behaviour, we do not yet have a full account of the relevance of spatiality to living self-organisation.

Here, we extend the REDS model of spatial networks with self-organised community structure to include the “small world” effect. We demonstrate that REDS networks can become small worlds with the introduction of a small amount of random rewiring. We then explore how this rewiring influences a simple dynamic process representing the contagious spread of infection or information.

We show that epidemic outbreaks arise more easily and spread faster on REDS networks compared to standard random geometric graphs (RGGs). Outbreaks spread even faster on randomly rewired small world REDS networks (due to their shorter path lengths) but initially find it more difficult to establish themselves (due to their reduced community structure). Overall, we find that small world REDS networks, with their combination of short characteristic path length, positive assortativity, strong community structure and high clustering, are more susceptible to a range of contagion dynamics than RGGs, and that they offer a useful abstract model for studying dynamics on spatially organised organic systems.
183-190
MIT Press
Antonioni, Alberto
6e2bfc87-11b9-4850-a84e-5dae12b46e72
Bullock, Seth
2ad576e4-56b8-4f31-84e0-51bd0b7a1cd3
Darabos, Christian
312cef32-94fc-4cdf-ab50-505e8f3718ce
Giacobini, Mario
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Iotti, Bryan N.
ca74329e-8ad7-47f3-ac7f-397e8ac08af1
Moore, Jason H.
5c115e7d-6816-4aca-b17b-d994ce674294
Tomassini, Marco
900e2019-588e-4a83-86d5-c5a108b462f3
Andrews, Paul
Caves, Leo
Doursat, Rene
Hickinbotham, Simon
Polack, Fiona
Stepney, Susan
Taylor, Tim
Timmis, Jon
Antonioni, Alberto
6e2bfc87-11b9-4850-a84e-5dae12b46e72
Bullock, Seth
2ad576e4-56b8-4f31-84e0-51bd0b7a1cd3
Darabos, Christian
312cef32-94fc-4cdf-ab50-505e8f3718ce
Giacobini, Mario
ef9ab530-920c-4886-952f-d06c3d93d071
Iotti, Bryan N.
ca74329e-8ad7-47f3-ac7f-397e8ac08af1
Moore, Jason H.
5c115e7d-6816-4aca-b17b-d994ce674294
Tomassini, Marco
900e2019-588e-4a83-86d5-c5a108b462f3
Andrews, Paul
Caves, Leo
Doursat, Rene
Hickinbotham, Simon
Polack, Fiona
Stepney, Susan
Taylor, Tim
Timmis, Jon

Antonioni, Alberto, Bullock, Seth, Darabos, Christian, Giacobini, Mario, Iotti, Bryan N., Moore, Jason H. and Tomassini, Marco (2015) Contagion on networks with self-organised community structure. Andrews, Paul, Caves, Leo, Doursat, Rene, Hickinbotham, Simon, Polack, Fiona, Stepney, Susan, Taylor, Tim and Timmis, Jon (eds.) In Advances in Artificial Life, ECAL 2015. MIT Press. pp. 183-190 .

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Living systems are organised in space. This imposes constraints on both their structural form and, consequently, their dynamics. While artificial life research has demonstrated that embedding an adaptive system in space tends to have a significant impact on its behaviour, we do not yet have a full account of the relevance of spatiality to living self-organisation.

Here, we extend the REDS model of spatial networks with self-organised community structure to include the “small world” effect. We demonstrate that REDS networks can become small worlds with the introduction of a small amount of random rewiring. We then explore how this rewiring influences a simple dynamic process representing the contagious spread of infection or information.

We show that epidemic outbreaks arise more easily and spread faster on REDS networks compared to standard random geometric graphs (RGGs). Outbreaks spread even faster on randomly rewired small world REDS networks (due to their shorter path lengths) but initially find it more difficult to establish themselves (due to their reduced community structure). Overall, we find that small world REDS networks, with their combination of short characteristic path length, positive assortativity, strong community structure and high clustering, are more susceptible to a range of contagion dynamics than RGGs, and that they offer a useful abstract model for studying dynamics on spatially organised organic systems.

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ECAL15-Contagion.pdf - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 28 April 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 July 2015
Published date: 24 July 2015
Venue - Dates: European Conference on Artificial Life (ECAL 2015), York, United Kingdom, 2015-07-20 - 2017-07-24
Organisations: Agents, Interactions & Complexity

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 376659
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/376659
PURE UUID: cfae83d0-0fc2-4032-8d47-e7edb7dff3c4

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Date deposited: 07 May 2015 07:38
Last modified: 17 Apr 2018 16:31

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