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Assessing nonresponse bias using call record data with applications to a longitudinal study

Assessing nonresponse bias using call record data with applications to a longitudinal study
Assessing nonresponse bias using call record data with applications to a longitudinal study
A method to monitor survey outcomes during fieldwork is proposed. The approach assesses nonresponse bias using call record data by comparing estimated and “true” distributions of specific survey variables at each call attempt using dissimilarity indices. These are compared with other survey quality indicators such as response rate, nonresponse bias, R-indicators, coefficients of variation, partial R-indicators and partial coefficients of variation. Empirical analyses are conducted using data from Understanding Society – the UK Household Longitudinal Study. Results show that survey estimates tend to stabilise after around 5 call attempts. The study demonstrates that a number of indicators commonly used, although adequate to assess nonresponse bias after data collection, may not be effective in capturing nonresponse bias during the call process. The study concludes that dissimilarity indices and coefficients of variation exhibit best properties. This research has implications for responsive and adaptive survey designs
University of Southampton
Correa, Solange
7863f596-e178-4429-9c46-cf07a1962048
Durrant, Gabriele
14fcc787-2666-46f2-a097-e4b98a210610
Smith, Peter
961a01a3-bf4c-43ca-9599-5be4fd5d3940
Correa, Solange
7863f596-e178-4429-9c46-cf07a1962048
Durrant, Gabriele
14fcc787-2666-46f2-a097-e4b98a210610
Smith, Peter
961a01a3-bf4c-43ca-9599-5be4fd5d3940

Correa, Solange, Durrant, Gabriele and Smith, Peter (2015) Assessing nonresponse bias using call record data with applications to a longitudinal study Southampton, GB. University of Southampton 38pp.

Record type: Monograph (Working Paper)

Abstract

A method to monitor survey outcomes during fieldwork is proposed. The approach assesses nonresponse bias using call record data by comparing estimated and “true” distributions of specific survey variables at each call attempt using dissimilarity indices. These are compared with other survey quality indicators such as response rate, nonresponse bias, R-indicators, coefficients of variation, partial R-indicators and partial coefficients of variation. Empirical analyses are conducted using data from Understanding Society – the UK Household Longitudinal Study. Results show that survey estimates tend to stabilise after around 5 call attempts. The study demonstrates that a number of indicators commonly used, although adequate to assess nonresponse bias after data collection, may not be effective in capturing nonresponse bias during the call process. The study concludes that dissimilarity indices and coefficients of variation exhibit best properties. This research has implications for responsive and adaptive survey designs

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More information

Published date: 19 April 2015
Organisations: Social Statistics & Demography

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 376761
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/376761
PURE UUID: 2b6da0ba-204a-444e-b852-d17e3d068834
ORCID for Peter Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4423-5410

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 May 2015 13:37
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:11

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Contributors

Author: Solange Correa
Author: Peter Smith ORCID iD

University divisions

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