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3D-printing of Redox flow batteries for energy storage: a rapid prototype laboratory cell

3D-printing of Redox flow batteries for energy storage: a rapid prototype laboratory cell
3D-printing of Redox flow batteries for energy storage: a rapid prototype laboratory cell
Although interest in redox flow batteries (RFBs) for energy storage has grown over the last few years, implementation of RFB technology has been slow and challenging. Recent developments in 3D-printing of materials enable a transforming technology for fast, reproducible and documented cell manufacture. This technology can give an improved engineering approach to cell design and fabrication, needed to fulfil requirements for lower cost, longer lifetime hardware capable of efficient reliable performance. It can also be used to implement a flexible design methodology to suit various scales of operation, usually important during RFB development. In the case of electrolyte flow features, these needs are especially well met by fast prototyping strategies. This paper demonstrates the importance of 3D-printing for the realization of a hybrid zinc-cerium RFB laboratory cell. The design and fabrication process is described and the benefits offered by 3D-printing are considered. Finally, further opportunities offered by this approach to RFB manufacture and research are highlighted.
2162-8769
P3080-P3085
Arenas, L.F.
6e7e3d10-2aab-4fc3-a6d4-63a6614d0403
Walsh, F.C.
309528e7-062e-439b-af40-9309bc91efb2
Ponce de Leon, C.
508a312e-75ff-4bcb-9151-dacc424d755c
Arenas, L.F.
6e7e3d10-2aab-4fc3-a6d4-63a6614d0403
Walsh, F.C.
309528e7-062e-439b-af40-9309bc91efb2
Ponce de Leon, C.
508a312e-75ff-4bcb-9151-dacc424d755c

Arenas, L.F., Walsh, F.C. and Ponce de Leon, C. (2015) 3D-printing of Redox flow batteries for energy storage: a rapid prototype laboratory cell. [in special issue: JSS Focus Issue on Printable Functional Materials for Electronics and Energy Applications] ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology, 4 (4), P3080-P3085. (doi:10.1149/2.0141504jss).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Although interest in redox flow batteries (RFBs) for energy storage has grown over the last few years, implementation of RFB technology has been slow and challenging. Recent developments in 3D-printing of materials enable a transforming technology for fast, reproducible and documented cell manufacture. This technology can give an improved engineering approach to cell design and fabrication, needed to fulfil requirements for lower cost, longer lifetime hardware capable of efficient reliable performance. It can also be used to implement a flexible design methodology to suit various scales of operation, usually important during RFB development. In the case of electrolyte flow features, these needs are especially well met by fast prototyping strategies. This paper demonstrates the importance of 3D-printing for the realization of a hybrid zinc-cerium RFB laboratory cell. The design and fabrication process is described and the benefits offered by 3D-printing are considered. Finally, further opportunities offered by this approach to RFB manufacture and research are highlighted.

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Published date: 26 February 2015
Organisations: Engineering Science Unit

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 376879
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/376879
ISSN: 2162-8769
PURE UUID: 15fc2e87-73f7-47fd-ba84-c018e8970b02
ORCID for C. Ponce de Leon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1907-5913

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Date deposited: 07 May 2015 16:00
Last modified: 31 Jul 2019 00:42

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