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It's never too late to publish an abandoned trial

It's never too late to publish an abandoned trial
It's never too late to publish an abandoned trial
It is estimated that half of all trials have never been published which can lead to patients being denied the most effective treatment and being exposed to unnecessary side effects. Furthermore the trial participants have been misinformed since the trial results have not contributed to the care of future patients.

However the non-publication of trials is often not due to a deliberate decision to cover up results. Commonly in academia it is due to more understandable reasons such as researchers having busy clinical posts, moving onto other more demanding projects, changing research areas or starting a family. This is called the “file drawer” problem.

The examples in this editorial demonstrate that it is possible to go back, even decades later, and make the results available to inform future evidence based medicine. We call on others to look into their “file drawer” for unpublished trials.
1-2
Shiles, C.
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Sinclair, J.M.A.
be3e54d5-c6da-4950-b0ba-3cb8cdcab13c
Shiles, C.
06563301-0f7c-41c7-987c-462064159479
Sinclair, J.M.A.
be3e54d5-c6da-4950-b0ba-3cb8cdcab13c

Shiles, C. and Sinclair, J.M.A. (2015) It's never too late to publish an abandoned trial. F1000 Research, 4 (120), 1-2. (doi:10.12688/f1000research.6519.1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

It is estimated that half of all trials have never been published which can lead to patients being denied the most effective treatment and being exposed to unnecessary side effects. Furthermore the trial participants have been misinformed since the trial results have not contributed to the care of future patients.

However the non-publication of trials is often not due to a deliberate decision to cover up results. Commonly in academia it is due to more understandable reasons such as researchers having busy clinical posts, moving onto other more demanding projects, changing research areas or starting a family. This is called the “file drawer” problem.

The examples in this editorial demonstrate that it is possible to go back, even decades later, and make the results available to inform future evidence based medicine. We call on others to look into their “file drawer” for unpublished trials.

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Shiles&Sinclair F1000Research 2015,4,120.pdf - Version of Record
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More information

Published date: 15 May 2015
Organisations: Clinical & Experimental Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 377131
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/377131
PURE UUID: 7fdc2c22-e2b0-4a10-805f-18b70f252da8
ORCID for J.M.A. Sinclair: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1905-2025

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 May 2015 11:03
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 13:01

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Contributors

Author: C. Shiles
Author: J.M.A. Sinclair ORCID iD

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