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Analysis of splice variants for the C.-elegans orthologue of human neuroligin reveals a developmentally regulated transcript

Analysis of splice variants for the C.-elegans orthologue of human neuroligin reveals a developmentally regulated transcript
Analysis of splice variants for the C.-elegans orthologue of human neuroligin reveals a developmentally regulated transcript
Neuroligins are synaptic adhesion molecules and important determinants of synaptic function. They are expressed at postsynaptic sites and involved in synaptic organization through key extracellular and intracellular protein interactions. They undergo trans-synaptic interaction with presynaptic neurexins. Distinct neuroligins use differences in their intracellular domains to selectively recruit synaptic scaffolds and this plays an important role in how they encode specialization of synaptic function. Several levels of regulation including gene expression, splicing, protein translation and processing regulate the expression of neuroligin function. We have used in silico and cDNA analyses to investigate the mRNA splicing of the Caenorhabditis-elegans orthologue nlg-1. Transcript analysis highlights the potential for gene regulation with respect to both temporal expression and splicing. We found nlg-1 splice variants with all the predicted exons are a minor species relative to major splice variants lacking exons 13 and 14, or 14 alone. These major alternatively spliced variants change the intracellular domain of the gene product NLG-1. Interestingly, exon 14 encodes a cassette with two distinct potential functional domains. One is a polyproline SH3 binding domain and the other has homology to a region encoding the binding site for the scaffolding protein gephyrin in mammalian neuroligins. This suggests differential splicing impacts on NLG-1 competence to recruit intracellular binding partners. This may have developmental relevance as nlg-1 exon 14 containing transcripts are selectively expressed in L2-L3 larvae. These results highlight a developmental regulation of C.-elegans nlg-1 that could play a key role in the assembly of synaptic protein complexes during the early stages of nervous system development.
1567-133X
69-78
Calahorro, Fernando
dddfa373-d3cc-433f-8851-9ca37f2f3950
Holden-Dye, Lindy
8032bf60-5db6-40cb-b71c-ddda9d212c8e
O'Connor, Vincent
8021b06c-01a0-4925-9dde-a61c8fe278ca
Calahorro, Fernando
dddfa373-d3cc-433f-8851-9ca37f2f3950
Holden-Dye, Lindy
8032bf60-5db6-40cb-b71c-ddda9d212c8e
O'Connor, Vincent
8021b06c-01a0-4925-9dde-a61c8fe278ca

Calahorro, Fernando, Holden-Dye, Lindy and O'Connor, Vincent (2015) Analysis of splice variants for the C.-elegans orthologue of human neuroligin reveals a developmentally regulated transcript. Gene Expression Patterns, 17 (2), 69-78. (doi:10.1016/j.gep.2015.02.002). (PMID:25726726)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Neuroligins are synaptic adhesion molecules and important determinants of synaptic function. They are expressed at postsynaptic sites and involved in synaptic organization through key extracellular and intracellular protein interactions. They undergo trans-synaptic interaction with presynaptic neurexins. Distinct neuroligins use differences in their intracellular domains to selectively recruit synaptic scaffolds and this plays an important role in how they encode specialization of synaptic function. Several levels of regulation including gene expression, splicing, protein translation and processing regulate the expression of neuroligin function. We have used in silico and cDNA analyses to investigate the mRNA splicing of the Caenorhabditis-elegans orthologue nlg-1. Transcript analysis highlights the potential for gene regulation with respect to both temporal expression and splicing. We found nlg-1 splice variants with all the predicted exons are a minor species relative to major splice variants lacking exons 13 and 14, or 14 alone. These major alternatively spliced variants change the intracellular domain of the gene product NLG-1. Interestingly, exon 14 encodes a cassette with two distinct potential functional domains. One is a polyproline SH3 binding domain and the other has homology to a region encoding the binding site for the scaffolding protein gephyrin in mammalian neuroligins. This suggests differential splicing impacts on NLG-1 competence to recruit intracellular binding partners. This may have developmental relevance as nlg-1 exon 14 containing transcripts are selectively expressed in L2-L3 larvae. These results highlight a developmental regulation of C.-elegans nlg-1 that could play a key role in the assembly of synaptic protein complexes during the early stages of nervous system development.

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Accepted/In Press date: 19 February 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 February 2015
Published date: March 2015
Organisations: Biomedicine, Centre for Biological Sciences

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Local EPrints ID: 377232
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/377232
ISSN: 1567-133X
PURE UUID: 304f139c-aeff-4908-bb2c-807f6856a9d1
ORCID for Fernando Calahorro: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0659-7728

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Date deposited: 08 Jun 2015 10:31
Last modified: 31 Jul 2019 00:34

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Author: Fernando Calahorro ORCID iD

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