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Nutritional supplementation and artificial reproductive technique (ART) outcomes

Nutritional supplementation and artificial reproductive technique (ART) outcomes
Nutritional supplementation and artificial reproductive technique (ART) outcomes
Approximately one in six couples suffer from subfertility, and many seek treatment with artificial reproductive technologies (ART). Despite improvements in laboratory techniques and ovarian stimulation, ongoing pregnancy rates per cycle remain at ~25%. Couples wanting to improve their chances may turn to adjuvant therapies, such as nutritional supplements. There is growing evidence that periconceptional nutritional status is a key determinant of fertility and long-term health of the offspring, and a lucrative market has developed to meet the demand based on these benefits. However, the practice of routine dietary supplementation before and during IVF treatment has not been subject to well-powered prospective randomised trials. In this article, the potential roles of specific nutritional supplements in the context of improving IVF outcomes are reviewed and an assessment is made of the evidence base supporting their clinical use in this context. Finally, current research needs in the field are outlined
1031-3613
677-683
Kermack, Alexandra J
b9294c93-c736-4505-abe4-78bee493f1c2
Macklon, N.S.
7db1f4fc-a9f6-431f-a1f2-297bb8c9fb7e
Kermack, Alexandra J
b9294c93-c736-4505-abe4-78bee493f1c2
Macklon, N.S.
7db1f4fc-a9f6-431f-a1f2-297bb8c9fb7e

Kermack, Alexandra J and Macklon, N.S. (2015) Nutritional supplementation and artificial reproductive technique (ART) outcomes. [in special issue: Oocyte and Embryo Metabolism] Reproduction, Fertility and Development, 27 (4), 677-683. (doi:10.1071/RD14304). (PMID:25846211)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Approximately one in six couples suffer from subfertility, and many seek treatment with artificial reproductive technologies (ART). Despite improvements in laboratory techniques and ovarian stimulation, ongoing pregnancy rates per cycle remain at ~25%. Couples wanting to improve their chances may turn to adjuvant therapies, such as nutritional supplements. There is growing evidence that periconceptional nutritional status is a key determinant of fertility and long-term health of the offspring, and a lucrative market has developed to meet the demand based on these benefits. However, the practice of routine dietary supplementation before and during IVF treatment has not been subject to well-powered prospective randomised trials. In this article, the potential roles of specific nutritional supplements in the context of improving IVF outcomes are reviewed and an assessment is made of the evidence base supporting their clinical use in this context. Finally, current research needs in the field are outlined

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Published date: 7 April 2015
Organisations: Human Development & Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 377280
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/377280
ISSN: 1031-3613
PURE UUID: 012f0d96-6ac6-4697-bea6-94d96c2d5840
ORCID for Alexandra J Kermack: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9176-9426

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Date deposited: 28 May 2015 13:17
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 04:07

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Author: N.S. Macklon

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