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Core information set for oesophageal cancer surgery

Core information set for oesophageal cancer surgery
Core information set for oesophageal cancer surgery
Background: surgeons provide patients with information before surgery, although standards of information are lacking and practice varies. The development and use of a ‘core information set’ as baseline information before surgery may improve understanding. A core set is a minimum set of information to use in all consultations before a specific procedure. This study developed a core information set for oesophageal cancer surgery.

Methods: information was identified from the literature, observations of clinical consultations and patient interviews. This was integrated to create a questionnaire survey. Stakeholders (patients and professionals) were surveyed twice to assess views on importance of information from ‘not essential’ to ‘absolutely essential’ using Delphi methods. Items not meeting predefined criteria were discarded after each survey and the final retained items were voted on, in separate patient and professional stakeholder meetings, to agree the core set.

Results: some 67 information items were identified initially from multiple sources. Survey response rates were 76·5 per cent (185 of 242) and 54·8 per cent (126 of 230) for patients and professionals respectively (first round), and over 83 per cent in both groups thereafter. Health professionals rated short?term clinical outcomes most highly (technical complications), whereas patients prioritized information related to long?term benefits. The consensus meetings agreed the final set, which consisted of: in?hospital milestones to recovery, rates of open?and?close surgery, in?hospital mortality, major complications (reoperation), milestones in recovery after discharge, longer?term eating and drinking and overall quality of life, and chances of survival.

Conclusion: this study has established a core information set for surgery for oesophageal cancer
936-943
Blazeby, J.M.
6953771d-d47b-4878-be76-bca8a9e8531d
Macefield, R.
6713e224-6678-4d0d-a1ed-02677346376f
Blencowe, N.S.
50e48353-8fea-42cf-8359-613feb3b47d4
Jacobs, M.
2dd6040d-ec9a-4f11-880e-9e5505121763
McNair, A.G.K.
a141c69a-f5db-4f1a-939c-7804b953d367
Sprangers, M.
5536803d-b8d5-4c0e-887f-7d6e224d51e7
Brookes, S.T.
89263ef1-2904-4ae7-84d1-b4131013916e
Underwood, T.J.
8e81bf60-edd2-4b0e-8324-3068c95ea1c6
Blazeby, J.M.
6953771d-d47b-4878-be76-bca8a9e8531d
Macefield, R.
6713e224-6678-4d0d-a1ed-02677346376f
Blencowe, N.S.
50e48353-8fea-42cf-8359-613feb3b47d4
Jacobs, M.
2dd6040d-ec9a-4f11-880e-9e5505121763
McNair, A.G.K.
a141c69a-f5db-4f1a-939c-7804b953d367
Sprangers, M.
5536803d-b8d5-4c0e-887f-7d6e224d51e7
Brookes, S.T.
89263ef1-2904-4ae7-84d1-b4131013916e
Underwood, T.J.
8e81bf60-edd2-4b0e-8324-3068c95ea1c6

Blazeby, J.M., Macefield, R., Blencowe, N.S., Jacobs, M., McNair, A.G.K., Sprangers, M., Brookes, S.T. and Underwood, T.J. (2015) Core information set for oesophageal cancer surgery. British Journal of Surgery, 102 (8), 936-943. (doi:10.1002/bjs.9840). (PMID:25980524)

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: surgeons provide patients with information before surgery, although standards of information are lacking and practice varies. The development and use of a ‘core information set’ as baseline information before surgery may improve understanding. A core set is a minimum set of information to use in all consultations before a specific procedure. This study developed a core information set for oesophageal cancer surgery.

Methods: information was identified from the literature, observations of clinical consultations and patient interviews. This was integrated to create a questionnaire survey. Stakeholders (patients and professionals) were surveyed twice to assess views on importance of information from ‘not essential’ to ‘absolutely essential’ using Delphi methods. Items not meeting predefined criteria were discarded after each survey and the final retained items were voted on, in separate patient and professional stakeholder meetings, to agree the core set.

Results: some 67 information items were identified initially from multiple sources. Survey response rates were 76·5 per cent (185 of 242) and 54·8 per cent (126 of 230) for patients and professionals respectively (first round), and over 83 per cent in both groups thereafter. Health professionals rated short?term clinical outcomes most highly (technical complications), whereas patients prioritized information related to long?term benefits. The consensus meetings agreed the final set, which consisted of: in?hospital milestones to recovery, rates of open?and?close surgery, in?hospital mortality, major complications (reoperation), milestones in recovery after discharge, longer?term eating and drinking and overall quality of life, and chances of survival.

Conclusion: this study has established a core information set for surgery for oesophageal cancer

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 31 March 2015
Published date: 18 May 2015
Additional Information: Timothy Underwood, member of Consensus Group
Organisations: Cancer Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 377328
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/377328
PURE UUID: 8aef3c40-116b-4d9c-9121-05c1a3cc2773
ORCID for T.J. Underwood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9455-2188

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 29 May 2015 10:11
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:45

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Contributors

Author: J.M. Blazeby
Author: R. Macefield
Author: N.S. Blencowe
Author: M. Jacobs
Author: A.G.K. McNair
Author: M. Sprangers
Author: S.T. Brookes
Author: T.J. Underwood ORCID iD

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