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Maternal diet as a modifier of offspring epigenetics

Maternal diet as a modifier of offspring epigenetics
Maternal diet as a modifier of offspring epigenetics
There has been a substantial body of evidence, which has shown that genetic variation is an important determinant of disease risk. However, there is now increasing evidence that alterations in epigenetic processes also play a role in determining susceptibility to disease. Epigenetic processes, which include DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs play a central role in regulating gene expression, determining when and where a gene is expressed as well as the level of gene expression. The epigenome is highly sensitive to a variety of environmental factors, especially in early life. One factor that has been shown consistently to alter the epigenome is maternal diet. This review will focus on how maternal diet can modify the epigenome of the offspring, producing different phenotypes and altered disease susceptibilities.
ageing, developmental origins of adult disease, DNA methylation, epigenetics, nutrition
88-95
Lillycrop, K.A.
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Burdge, G.C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Lillycrop, K.A.
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Burdge, G.C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159

Lillycrop, K.A. and Burdge, G.C. (2015) Maternal diet as a modifier of offspring epigenetics. Journal of Developmental Origins of Health and Disease, 6 (2), 88-95. (doi:10.1017/S2040174415000124). (PMID:25857738)

Record type: Article

Abstract

There has been a substantial body of evidence, which has shown that genetic variation is an important determinant of disease risk. However, there is now increasing evidence that alterations in epigenetic processes also play a role in determining susceptibility to disease. Epigenetic processes, which include DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs play a central role in regulating gene expression, determining when and where a gene is expressed as well as the level of gene expression. The epigenome is highly sensitive to a variety of environmental factors, especially in early life. One factor that has been shown consistently to alter the epigenome is maternal diet. This review will focus on how maternal diet can modify the epigenome of the offspring, producing different phenotypes and altered disease susceptibilities.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 26 January 2015
Published date: April 2015
Keywords: ageing, developmental origins of adult disease, DNA methylation, epigenetics, nutrition
Organisations: Biomedicine

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 377363
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/377363
PURE UUID: 5764bac9-607c-4c33-a40e-9ea837696376
ORCID for K.A. Lillycrop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7350-5489
ORCID for G.C. Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Jun 2015 11:01
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 00:56

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