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Environmental challenge, epigenetic plasticity and the induction of altered phenotypes in mammals

Environmental challenge, epigenetic plasticity and the induction of altered phenotypes in mammals
Environmental challenge, epigenetic plasticity and the induction of altered phenotypes in mammals
The level of transcriptional activity of a gene is regulated by epigenetic processes. There is compelling evidence that environmental challenges throughout the life course can induce phenotypic change. In this review, we summarize the current evidence, focusing specifically on the effects of nutrition and of environmental pollutants, that epigenetic processes underpin the induction by environmental change of altered phenotypic traits, emphasizing the implications for health outcomes. We also discuss whether epigenetic processes may be involved in the passage of induced traits between generations. Overall, current findings indicate that epigenetic processes may play an important role in determining disease risk, but there is a lack of studies that demonstrate causal links between epigenetic change and tissue function.
1750-1911
623-636
Lillycrop, Karen A.
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Burdge, Graham C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159
Lillycrop, Karen A.
eeaaa78d-0c4d-4033-a178-60ce7345a2cc
Burdge, Graham C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159

Lillycrop, Karen A. and Burdge, Graham C. (2014) Environmental challenge, epigenetic plasticity and the induction of altered phenotypes in mammals. Epigenomics, 6 (6), 623-636. (doi:10.2217/epi.14.51). (PMID:25531256)

Record type: Article

Abstract

The level of transcriptional activity of a gene is regulated by epigenetic processes. There is compelling evidence that environmental challenges throughout the life course can induce phenotypic change. In this review, we summarize the current evidence, focusing specifically on the effects of nutrition and of environmental pollutants, that epigenetic processes underpin the induction by environmental change of altered phenotypic traits, emphasizing the implications for health outcomes. We also discuss whether epigenetic processes may be involved in the passage of induced traits between generations. Overall, current findings indicate that epigenetic processes may play an important role in determining disease risk, but there is a lack of studies that demonstrate causal links between epigenetic change and tissue function.

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More information

Published date: 2014
Organisations: Biomedicine, Centre for Biological Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 377491
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/377491
ISSN: 1750-1911
PURE UUID: 4b080331-c4b5-40de-ab23-dd411f0f2965
ORCID for Karen A. Lillycrop: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7350-5489
ORCID for Graham C. Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Jun 2015 13:01
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:23

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