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Robust supply chain strategies for recovering from unanticipated disasters

Robust supply chain strategies for recovering from unanticipated disasters
Robust supply chain strategies for recovering from unanticipated disasters
Recovering from unanticipated disasters is critical in today’s global market. This paper examines the effectiveness of popular recovery strategies used to address unpredictable disasters that derail supply chains. We create a formal model to portray dynamic operational performance among supply chain firms facing disruptions caused by natural and man-made disasters. Our analysis shows that a supply chain recovers best if member firms adopt a radical, rapid, costly recovery strategy that immediately resolves the disruption. This observation is robust to various resource consumption requirements. We apply our methodology in the case of Taiwan’s 2011 food contamination scandal and provide managerial insights.
emergency management, supply chain disruptions, supply chain vulnerability, cellular automata, complex systems, behavioural game theory
1366-5545
198-214
Chen, Li-Ming
24d21ae4-9dcf-47ec-8738-dd53e243ec37
Liu, Yan Emma
da9a2411-43b8-4d88-acc9-5c51c722aade
Yang, Shu-Jung Sunny
b02a7cdb-58d8-40dc-a674-1aa32a85e3e8
Chen, Li-Ming
24d21ae4-9dcf-47ec-8738-dd53e243ec37
Liu, Yan Emma
da9a2411-43b8-4d88-acc9-5c51c722aade
Yang, Shu-Jung Sunny
b02a7cdb-58d8-40dc-a674-1aa32a85e3e8

Chen, Li-Ming, Liu, Yan Emma and Yang, Shu-Jung Sunny (2015) Robust supply chain strategies for recovering from unanticipated disasters. Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, 77, 198-214. (doi:10.1016/j.tre.2015.02.015).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recovering from unanticipated disasters is critical in today’s global market. This paper examines the effectiveness of popular recovery strategies used to address unpredictable disasters that derail supply chains. We create a formal model to portray dynamic operational performance among supply chain firms facing disruptions caused by natural and man-made disasters. Our analysis shows that a supply chain recovers best if member firms adopt a radical, rapid, costly recovery strategy that immediately resolves the disruption. This observation is robust to various resource consumption requirements. We apply our methodology in the case of Taiwan’s 2011 food contamination scandal and provide managerial insights.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 February 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 March 2015
Published date: May 2015
Keywords: emergency management, supply chain disruptions, supply chain vulnerability, cellular automata, complex systems, behavioural game theory
Organisations: Southampton Business School

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 377513
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/377513
ISSN: 1366-5545
PURE UUID: 6e6216e9-26ed-49c3-95e1-818b91dc727e

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Jun 2015 08:44
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 20:59

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