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Reproducing automotive engine scuffing using a lubricated reciprocating contact

Reproducing automotive engine scuffing using a lubricated reciprocating contact
Reproducing automotive engine scuffing using a lubricated reciprocating contact
The frequency and severity of scuffing in automotive engines has the potential to increase due to new low-viscosity lubricants for fuel efficiency and increased cylinder power output. This work is to understand the fundamental causes and events resulting in piston ring and liner scuffing. A TE-77 high frequency reciprocating tribometer was used with a synthetic PAO base oil (4cSt) to reciprocate a 52100 G5 barrel against a ground pearlitic Grade 250 grey cast iron.

Samples were run-in at 50 N and 10 Hz prior to a temperature ramp to 150 °C followed by a discreet load ramp to 1 kN (0.49 GPa). The tests were terminated when a sharp increase in the average friction force was observed indicating that scuffing had occurred. 3D optical profilometry showed that the scuffed cast iron surface consisted of smeared platelets and craters of View the MathML source35?m depth. SEM and EDX analyses suggested adhesive transfer of cast iron material to the counter-surface was occurring by failure along lamellar graphite interfaces. Tests were repeated using instantaneous high-speed friction data and indicated that micro-scuffing initiated at a load of 620 N. Focused ion beam cross-sections of the mildly scuffed surface confirmed the mechanism of sub-surface crack initiation occurring along lamellar graphite boundaries.
automotive, FIB, Grey cast iron, high speed friction, lubrication, scuffing
0043-1648
1193-1199
Kamps, T.J.
fde15660-4064-4ba7-96dd-7c8ba6e929d0
Walker, J.C.
b300eafd-5b0a-4cf5-86d2-735813b04c6f
Wood, R.J.K.
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73
Lee, P.M.
a8d0978c-e89b-4b32-8950-910704d5e76a
Plint, A.G.
6c8605f1-1cbd-4fa9-9251-f2250fdfdb9a
Kamps, T.J.
fde15660-4064-4ba7-96dd-7c8ba6e929d0
Walker, J.C.
b300eafd-5b0a-4cf5-86d2-735813b04c6f
Wood, R.J.K.
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73
Lee, P.M.
a8d0978c-e89b-4b32-8950-910704d5e76a
Plint, A.G.
6c8605f1-1cbd-4fa9-9251-f2250fdfdb9a

Kamps, T.J., Walker, J.C., Wood, R.J.K., Lee, P.M. and Plint, A.G. (2015) Reproducing automotive engine scuffing using a lubricated reciprocating contact. [in special issue: 20th Intenational Conference on Wear Materials] Wear, 332-333, 1193-1199. (doi:10.1016/j.wear.2014.12.045).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The frequency and severity of scuffing in automotive engines has the potential to increase due to new low-viscosity lubricants for fuel efficiency and increased cylinder power output. This work is to understand the fundamental causes and events resulting in piston ring and liner scuffing. A TE-77 high frequency reciprocating tribometer was used with a synthetic PAO base oil (4cSt) to reciprocate a 52100 G5 barrel against a ground pearlitic Grade 250 grey cast iron.

Samples were run-in at 50 N and 10 Hz prior to a temperature ramp to 150 °C followed by a discreet load ramp to 1 kN (0.49 GPa). The tests were terminated when a sharp increase in the average friction force was observed indicating that scuffing had occurred. 3D optical profilometry showed that the scuffed cast iron surface consisted of smeared platelets and craters of View the MathML source35?m depth. SEM and EDX analyses suggested adhesive transfer of cast iron material to the counter-surface was occurring by failure along lamellar graphite interfaces. Tests were repeated using instantaneous high-speed friction data and indicated that micro-scuffing initiated at a load of 620 N. Focused ion beam cross-sections of the mildly scuffed surface confirmed the mechanism of sub-surface crack initiation occurring along lamellar graphite boundaries.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: April 2015
Published date: May 2015
Keywords: automotive, FIB, Grey cast iron, high speed friction, lubrication, scuffing
Organisations: nCATS Group

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 377675
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/377675
ISSN: 0043-1648
PURE UUID: ad8d3b5a-01bc-499d-9916-8508668f1eb4
ORCID for T.J. Kamps: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6660-7070
ORCID for R.J.K. Wood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0681-9239

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Jun 2015 11:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:55

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Contributors

Author: T.J. Kamps ORCID iD
Author: J.C. Walker
Author: R.J.K. Wood ORCID iD
Author: P.M. Lee
Author: A.G. Plint

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