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Opportunities in primary care for reducing stroke rates: a cross-sectional study of the differences in the control of hypertension between ethnic groups

Opportunities in primary care for reducing stroke rates: a cross-sectional study of the differences in the control of hypertension between ethnic groups
Opportunities in primary care for reducing stroke rates: a cross-sectional study of the differences in the control of hypertension between ethnic groups
Aim: to compare blood pressure control and management patterns among hypertensive patients of Caucasian and ethnic minority origin.

Methods: this study involved a retrospective case-note assessment of the quality of care received over a 3-year period of 199 Caucasian and 50 ethnic minority patients with established essential hypertension attending an inner city UK general medical practice.

Results: compared to Caucasian patients, patients from ethnic minority origins were more likely to have a mean diastolic blood pressure above 90 mmHg adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, body mass index, smoking, alcohol, and family history of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease (OR = 2.6, p = 0.02). Ethnic minority patients had an average of five more general practice visits annually than Caucasian patients (p < 0.01). However, the mean number of blood pressure readings per year did not differ significantly between the two groups. The most commonly used antihypertensive drug in ethnic minority patients was atenolol compared to bendroflauzide in Caucasian patients.

Conclusions: there is scope for improving the control of blood pressure, and hence influencing vascular disease rates, in ethnic minority populations. The use of evidence-based hypertension treatment tailored to ethnic origin could be improved and the higher number of GP visits for these patients could be utilized to optimize blood pressure control. However, public health strategies need to take account of the possible higher primary care workload inherent in achieving good control in such populations
1447-056X
Alwan, Nisreen A.
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Packham, Chris J.
0c83eff2-c7e9-4814-a0f3-ad73ec5c149b
Alwan, Nisreen A.
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Packham, Chris J.
0c83eff2-c7e9-4814-a0f3-ad73ec5c149b

Alwan, Nisreen A. and Packham, Chris J. (2006) Opportunities in primary care for reducing stroke rates: a cross-sectional study of the differences in the control of hypertension between ethnic groups. Asia Pacific Journal of Family Medicine, 5 (2).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aim: to compare blood pressure control and management patterns among hypertensive patients of Caucasian and ethnic minority origin.

Methods: this study involved a retrospective case-note assessment of the quality of care received over a 3-year period of 199 Caucasian and 50 ethnic minority patients with established essential hypertension attending an inner city UK general medical practice.

Results: compared to Caucasian patients, patients from ethnic minority origins were more likely to have a mean diastolic blood pressure above 90 mmHg adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, body mass index, smoking, alcohol, and family history of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease (OR = 2.6, p = 0.02). Ethnic minority patients had an average of five more general practice visits annually than Caucasian patients (p < 0.01). However, the mean number of blood pressure readings per year did not differ significantly between the two groups. The most commonly used antihypertensive drug in ethnic minority patients was atenolol compared to bendroflauzide in Caucasian patients.

Conclusions: there is scope for improving the control of blood pressure, and hence influencing vascular disease rates, in ethnic minority populations. The use of evidence-based hypertension treatment tailored to ethnic origin could be improved and the higher number of GP visits for these patients could be utilized to optimize blood pressure control. However, public health strategies need to take account of the possible higher primary care workload inherent in achieving good control in such populations

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 10 July 2006
Published date: 2006
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 377800
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/377800
ISSN: 1447-056X
PURE UUID: dabccfe1-c9a8-4dda-ba5b-5e07f4e53f42
ORCID for Nisreen A. Alwan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4134-8463

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Jun 2015 15:33
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:21

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