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From sea to land and back again: understanding the shifting character of Europe's landscapes and seascapes over the last million years

From sea to land and back again: understanding the shifting character of Europe's landscapes and seascapes over the last million years
From sea to land and back again: understanding the shifting character of Europe's landscapes and seascapes over the last million years
The palaeogeography of the northwest margin of Europe has changed markedly, and regularly, since humans first occupied the region around one million years ago (Parfitt et al. 2010). Britain as we know it today has morphed from peninsula to island and back again in response to glacial cycles on at least five occasions over this period. Understanding the timing, nature and extent of these changes is fundamental to appreciating the context within which archaeologically attested activity occurred. That being said, it is argued here that rather than just providing an environmental backdrop to a well-known story, knowledge of the rate, pace and degree of change can provide a secure vantage point from which to reconsider a range of key questions concerning connectivity and social change throughout prehistory
978-1-78297-809-1
7-27
Oxbow
Sturt, Fraser
442e14e1-136f-4159-bd8e-b002bf6b95f6
Anderson-Whymark, Hugo
Garrow, Duncan
Sturt, Fraser
Sturt, Fraser
442e14e1-136f-4159-bd8e-b002bf6b95f6
Anderson-Whymark, Hugo
Garrow, Duncan
Sturt, Fraser

Sturt, Fraser (2015) From sea to land and back again: understanding the shifting character of Europe's landscapes and seascapes over the last million years. In, Anderson-Whymark, Hugo, Garrow, Duncan and Sturt, Fraser (eds.) Continental Connections: Exploring Cross-Channel Relationships from the Mesolithic to the Iron Age. Oxford, GB. Oxbow, pp. 7-27.

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

The palaeogeography of the northwest margin of Europe has changed markedly, and regularly, since humans first occupied the region around one million years ago (Parfitt et al. 2010). Britain as we know it today has morphed from peninsula to island and back again in response to glacial cycles on at least five occasions over this period. Understanding the timing, nature and extent of these changes is fundamental to appreciating the context within which archaeologically attested activity occurred. That being said, it is argued here that rather than just providing an environmental backdrop to a well-known story, knowledge of the rate, pace and degree of change can provide a secure vantage point from which to reconsider a range of key questions concerning connectivity and social change throughout prehistory

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Published date: 2015
Organisations: Archaeology

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Local EPrints ID: 377827
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/377827
ISBN: 978-1-78297-809-1
PURE UUID: 3d0fcb71-875d-425f-b71c-38ed18efca42

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Date deposited: 22 Jun 2015 12:28
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 20:56

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