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PPO.09 The relationship between birthweight and brachio-femoral pulse wave velocity in early infancy: findings from a British birth cohort (Baby VIP study)

PPO.09 The relationship between birthweight and brachio-femoral pulse wave velocity in early infancy: findings from a British birth cohort (Baby VIP study)
PPO.09 The relationship between birthweight and brachio-femoral pulse wave velocity in early infancy: findings from a British birth cohort (Baby VIP study)
Background: in adults, pulse wave velocity (PWV) is regarded as a predictor of cardiovascular disease.1 However, associations in infants are not well established. One study has linked neonatal aortic PWV, at 1–3 days, with birthweight and maternal blood pressure.2

Aim: to examine the relationship between infant brachio-femoral PWV and size at birth.

Methods: Baby VIP study recruited 362 newborn babies from the Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, including 64 small for gestational age (SGA) (18%). PWV was measured non-invasively from each baby at a follow-up home visit 2–6 weeks after recruitment, using the Vicorder kit. Birthweight and other covariables were collected from the delivery and antenatal medical notes. Individualised birthweight centiles were calculated using the GROW-Centile calculator taking into account maternal weight, height, parity, ethnicity, gestational age and baby’s sex.3

Results: mean birthweight was 3329 g (standard deviation [sd] 632). Mean infant PWV was 6.7 m/s (sd 1.3). In univariable analysis, SGA babies had, on average, lower PWV by 0.4 m/s (95% confidence interval 0.0, 0.9, P = 0.04). This association persisted after adjusting for pregnancy factors including maternal smoking, pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, blood pressure at booking and 36 weeks, and infant factors including type of feeding, baby’s age, position and whether asleep or awake at the time of measurement (0.5 m/s lower, 0.1, 0.9, P = 0.02).

Conclusion: this study has demonstrated the feasibility and acceptability of measuring PWV in early infancy. SGA was associated with a lower PWV. These findings support the evidence linking SGA with cardiovascular indicators, even very early in life
1359-2998
A153
Alwan, N.
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Cade, J.
aa69a0d4-625a-4e0c-af44-d6394d504619
Greenwood, D.
1550ab9d-53ad-4f22-ab13-20bcd69c90d8
McArdle, H.
9330e021-25bf-4258-a34d-4fa7b0234395
Ciantar, E.
25ecaac8-9944-4fbb-8d14-2541fe40a0c9
Simpson, N.
7db5f42e-5731-4c11-aad3-57d97f9bfbec
Alwan, N.
0d37b320-f325-4ed3-ba51-0fe2866d5382
Cade, J.
aa69a0d4-625a-4e0c-af44-d6394d504619
Greenwood, D.
1550ab9d-53ad-4f22-ab13-20bcd69c90d8
McArdle, H.
9330e021-25bf-4258-a34d-4fa7b0234395
Ciantar, E.
25ecaac8-9944-4fbb-8d14-2541fe40a0c9
Simpson, N.
7db5f42e-5731-4c11-aad3-57d97f9bfbec

Alwan, N., Cade, J., Greenwood, D., McArdle, H., Ciantar, E. and Simpson, N. (2014) PPO.09 The relationship between birthweight and brachio-femoral pulse wave velocity in early infancy: findings from a British birth cohort (Baby VIP study). Archives of Disease in Childhood - Fetal and Neonatal Edition, 99, supplement 1, A153. (doi:10.1136/archdischild-2014-306576.449).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: in adults, pulse wave velocity (PWV) is regarded as a predictor of cardiovascular disease.1 However, associations in infants are not well established. One study has linked neonatal aortic PWV, at 1–3 days, with birthweight and maternal blood pressure.2

Aim: to examine the relationship between infant brachio-femoral PWV and size at birth.

Methods: Baby VIP study recruited 362 newborn babies from the Leeds Teaching Hospitals Trust, including 64 small for gestational age (SGA) (18%). PWV was measured non-invasively from each baby at a follow-up home visit 2–6 weeks after recruitment, using the Vicorder kit. Birthweight and other covariables were collected from the delivery and antenatal medical notes. Individualised birthweight centiles were calculated using the GROW-Centile calculator taking into account maternal weight, height, parity, ethnicity, gestational age and baby’s sex.3

Results: mean birthweight was 3329 g (standard deviation [sd] 632). Mean infant PWV was 6.7 m/s (sd 1.3). In univariable analysis, SGA babies had, on average, lower PWV by 0.4 m/s (95% confidence interval 0.0, 0.9, P = 0.04). This association persisted after adjusting for pregnancy factors including maternal smoking, pre-eclampsia, gestational diabetes, blood pressure at booking and 36 weeks, and infant factors including type of feeding, baby’s age, position and whether asleep or awake at the time of measurement (0.5 m/s lower, 0.1, 0.9, P = 0.02).

Conclusion: this study has demonstrated the feasibility and acceptability of measuring PWV in early infancy. SGA was associated with a lower PWV. These findings support the evidence linking SGA with cardiovascular indicators, even very early in life

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More information

Published date: 2014
Organisations: Primary Care & Population Sciences

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 377940
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/377940
ISSN: 1359-2998
PURE UUID: 8cc251ba-b61c-4518-a69a-a3de6a079f5f
ORCID for N. Alwan: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4134-8463

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Date deposited: 11 Jun 2015 08:31
Last modified: 06 Jun 2018 12:21

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